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MARCH 2009

Today in History March 31, 2009
1776 - Abigail Adams wrote to her husband John that women were "determined to foment a rebellion" if the new Declaration of Independence failed to guarantee
their rights.
1862 - Skirmishing between Rebels and Union forces took place at Island 10 on the Mississippi River.
1880 - Wabash, IN, became the first town to be completely illuminated with electric light.
1889 - In Paris, the Eiffel Tower officially opened.
1908 - 250,000 coal miners in Indianapolis, IN, went on strike to await a wage adjustment.
1918 - For the first time in the U.S., Daylight Saving Time went into effect.
1923 - In New York City, the first U.S. dance marathon was held. Alma Cummings set a new world record of 27 hours.
1932 - The Ford Motor Co. debuted its V-8 engine.
1933 - The U.S. Congress authorized the Civilian Conservation Corps to relieve rampant unemployment.
1958 - The U.S. Navy formed the atomic submarine division.
1966 - An estimated 200,000 anti-war demonstrators march in New York City.
1976 - The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that Karen Anne Quinlan could be disconnected from a respirator. Quinlan remained comatose until 1985 when she
died.
1980 - U.S. President Carter deregulated the banking industry.

PAYDAY: GM's Rick Wagoner Drives Away with $20M Retirement -- Rick Wagoner will leave his post as CEO of bailed-out General Motors with a $20 million retirement package, the company's financial filings show.

The Logistical Nightmare in Iraq -- 283 Bases, 170,000 Pieces of Equipment, 140,000 Troops, and an Army of Mercenaries!

Calif. plant recalls 1M pounds of pistachios -- A California food processing plant is voluntarily recalling up to 1 million pounds of roasted pistachio products that may have been contaminated with salmonella, the FDA announced Monday. The nuts came from Setton Farms in Terra Bella, California — about 75 miles south of Fresno — and were largely distributed in 2,000 pound shipments to food wholesalers who would then package them for resale.

South Carolina Firm Recalls Frozen Meat and Poultry Products Due To Misbranding and Lack of USDA Inspection -- All frozen meat and poultry products produced from April 3, 2008, through March 7, 2009, bearing the establishment number "EST. 19825" inside the USDA mark of inspection, are subject to recall.

Big Pharma's Latest Insanity? -- A "PolyPill" Combining Five Different Drugs Into One Pill.

Morgellons: Trisha Springstead Shares Her Treatment and Prevention Protocol -- The best approach for prevention and treatment is to get the body in a condition where it is not receptive to the disease, or to create an environment that is no longer hospitable to continuation of the disease.

Panel: All teens should be tested for depression -- 2 million in U.S. are affected but most are undiagnosed, task force says.

Statins Cause Heart Attacks in Some Users -- Surprisingly, researchers found that people with high PLTP levels didn't have more heart attacks, unless they were taking statins -- taking the drugs gave them a significant increase in their heart attack risk.

Pa. Amish farmer gets jail time in outhouse dispute -- A western Pennsylvania Amish farmer was sentenced Tuesday to 90 days in jail after refusing to bring a pair of outhouses into compliance with state sewage laws. Read More...

Land Line Magazine special - Into the Matrix! -- New fitness plan would pull millions of truck drivers off the road.

Soldiers help reviewed after Ala. shootings -- The deployment of 22 active-duty military police and the provost marshal from Fort Rucker, Ala., to the scene of a civilian killing spree 25 miles from post may have violated federal law. But the deployment may also have been within the legal parameters of how the military is permitted to assist civilian authorities in cases of emergencies.

Soldiers Blinded, Hospitalized by Laser 'Friendly Fire' -- An American soldier was blinded in one eye and three others required medical evacuation out of Iraq in a series of laser "friendly fire" incidents, the U.S. military has disclosed. These injuries are caused by the misuse of dangerous green-laser dazzlers.

Air Force Blocking the Military's Own Video Site -- It was discovered last week that a bunch of military bases - especially Air Force bases - were blocking TroopTube, the Pentagon's YouTube knock-off. Today, we learned that the digital blockades were part of a larger, Air Force-wide decision to cut off access to the military's taxpayer-funded, security-scrubbed, low-bandwidth-optimized video sharing site.

How insurers secretly blacklist millions with common ailments -- ''This is absolutely the standard way of doing business,'' said Santiago Leon, a health insurance broker in Miami. Being denied for preexisting conditions is well known, but when a person sees the usually confidential list of automatic denials for himself, "that's a eureka moment. That shows you how harsh the system is.''

Researchers examine use of native southern African plants in veterinary medicine -- Southern Africa is rich in botanical and cultural diversity, which makes it an ideal environment to study plants as a component of ethno-veterinary medicine.

Kansans to vote on gun ownership amendment -- | Next year, Kansans will vote whether to change the state constitution to guarantee individual gun rights.

GAO urges public to report stimulus law waste -- The Government Accountability Office today urged government employees, contractors and the public to report the illegal use or mismanagement of the billions that are being distributed under the economic stimulus law.

Scarce Daddy Long Legs Is Devastating Bird Populations -- Warm summers are dramatically reducing populations of daddy long legs, which in turn is having a severe impact on the bird populations which rely on them for food.

Peering into the Abyss by Peter Schiff -- Given the size and scope of the remedies that the Obama Administration is cajoling the world to adopt, it is likely that the unease will grow until many countries emerge in open revolt to America’s plans.

'How to break through police lines' -- G20 protesters are circulating detailed pamphlets advising people on how to win street battles against riot police and what to do if arrested.

Law firms lining up to attract drywall clients -- At least 30 law groups from Florida to California, many specializing in personal injury and product-liability cases, have either filed lawsuits or are recruiting plaintiffs to sue over allegedly defective Chinese-made drywall. Some firms are taking a different tack, seeking to represent defendants against potential drywall-related claims.

PETA Killed 95 Percent of Adoptable Pets in its Care During 2008 -- Today the nonprofit Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF) published documents online showing that People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) killed 95 percent of the adoptable pets in its care during 2008. Despite years of public outrage over its euthanasia program, the animal rights group kills an average of 5.8 pets every day at its Norfolk, VA headquarters.

Fusion Center Agents Working Public Forums? -- We're seeing a growing trend of forum infiltration by persons that monitor those forums to quickly debunk, and/or provide disinformation, when the subject matter is about Barack Obama.

Surveillance vehicles take flight using alternative energy -- Fuel cell powered UAVs are taking flight as an Office of Naval Research (ONR)-sponsored program to help tactical decision-makers gather critical information more efficiently... and more quietly.

Today in History March 30, 2009
1822 - Florida became a U.S. territory.
1842 - Dr. Crawford W. Long performed the first operation while his patient was anesthetized by ether.
1855 - About 5,000 "Border Ruffians" from western Missouri invaded the territory of Kansas and forced the election of a pro-slavery legislature. It was the
first election in Kansas.
1858 - Hyman L. Lipman of Philadelphia patented the pencil.
1867 - The U.S. purchased Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million dollars.
1870 - The 15th amendment, guaranteeing the right to vote regardless of race, was passed by the U.S. Congress.
1909 - The Queensboro bridge in New York opened linking Manhattan and Queens. It was the first double decker bridge.
1909 - In Oklahoma, Seminole Indians revolted against meager pay for government jobs.
1941 - The German Afrika Korps under General Erwin Rommel began its first offensive against British forces in Libya.
1950 - The invention of the phototransistor was announced.
1981 - U.S. President Ronald Reagan was shot and wounded in Washington, DC, by John W. Hinckley Jr. Two police officers and Press Secretary James Brady were
also wounded.
1998 - Rolls-Royce was purchased by BMW in a $570 million deal.

Possible Ohio Pandemic Outbreak by Jimm Motyka -- JimmyOnTheSpot.com (JOTS) has learned some pretty startling info, which can be validated by our sources and appended links, regarding a possible pandemic outbreak. The info was vetted and everything appears to be pointing to the possibility to northeast Ohio being a possible launching pad for a pandemic as early as this April 29th.

U.S. National Flu Map ending Jan. 10, 2009 - -Influenza activity estimates, as reported by state health departments. Weekly reports are published about 10-12 days after the "week ending" date, due to the time required to compile national data.
* U.S. National Flu Map ending Feb. 14, 2009
* U.S. National Flu Map ending March 14, 2009
More related articles of interest regarding Pandemics:
*
Flu Pandemic Coming, U.S. Not Prepared
* Avian Flu Pandemic Preparedness
* From pandemic flu site: Cleaning transit vehicles & facilities during a pandemic
* Living Through A Pandemic 2008, 2009, 2010
* Economic crisis may worsen disease threats
* This novel called "another place to die" was written in 2006 about the coming flu pandemic of 2009

Vexing computer worm to evolve on April Fool's Day -- Just an FYI to update virus protection for those who don't use Mac's. Be sure to keep up to date with security patches for Windows RPC Server Service.

GM boss steps down at White House’s request -- Under pressure from the White House, General Motors chairman and CEO Rick Wagoner quits as the government says the company has not done enough to turn itself around.

Banks to shut down during G20 protests -- Branches of Lloyds TSB and Halifax in the path of the G20 protesters are to be shut for two days to protect customers and staff during what could be angry demonstrations against banks bailed out by the taxpayer.

G20 protestors face police with tasers -- SCOTLAND YARD is to deploy officers armed with 50,000-volt Taser stun guns to deal with violent demonstrators planning to disrupt this week’s G20 summit in London.

Millions take to streets in economic protests -- Red Alert expects that by this summer, street protests will come to the United States, as the U.S. middle class increasingly becomes squeezed by fear of losing jobs and homes.

Suicide watch for soldiers in Iraq -- An unprecedented "suicide watch" has been launched by commanders at Britain's main military base in Iraq following the deaths of three soldiers.

Connecticut school bans physical contact -- East Shore M.S. Outlaws "High-Fives," "Hugging" And Horseplay Of Any Kind; Violators May Face Expulsion.

The ammo boom is no dud -- As gun shoppers are discovering, it's becoming easier to buy a gun than ammunition!
Related Article: Anti-jihad group helps fill U.S. ammo shortage -- America's Truth Forum announced it is making available through its website .223 Remington (5.56) rounds suitable for all sporting and military-style rifles, including the AR-15 and Ruger Mini-14.

FDA Under Increasing Pressure to Approve Stevia, Lift Import Ban -- The American Botanical Council (ABC) has called for the FDA to lift its ban on the importation of stevia for use as a sweetener, in an article by ABC founder and executive director Mark Blumenthal, printed in the organization's publication HerbalGram.

Economy leads to fewer trucks on Oklahoma Turnpike -- Trucking miles are down on the Oklahoma Turnpike so far in 2009 and officials say the national economy is the primary reason.

VW To Launch 258 MPG Car -- Cost $600 US. This is not a toy, not a concept car. It is a newly developed 2-seater car in highly aerodynamic tear-shape road-proven real car. It is ready to be launched as a single-seater for sale in Shanghai in 2010.

Freedom Tower Will Be Called One World Trade Center -- The agency that owns ground zero confirmed Thursday that the signature skyscraper replacing the towers destroyed on Sept. 11 will be more commonly known as One World Trade Center.

A Thought For The Day from Mike Tawse (in UK) -- Difference Inspires Learning.

YouTube: Nikola Tesla - The Forgotten Wizard -- The life story and work of Nikola Tesla. He invented AC electricity, Neon Lights, Radio transmission, The Electric motor, Wireless electricity transfer, Remote control, Hydraulics, Lasers, Space weapons, Robotics, and many, many more things.

North Carolina: Gunman 'told family he had cancer' before opening fire on U.S. nursing home, killing 8 -- While authorities declined to comment on a possible motive, Stewart's ex-wife said he had been reaching out recently to family members, telling them he had cancer and was preparing for a long trip and to 'go away.'

Economic Stimulus 2009: Spending for the States -- People should check the state they live in and see how this money is being used.

MARINE MAMMALS WILL DIE IN NAVY WARFARE TESTING PROGRAM -- The Navy Warfare Testing Program will “…utilize mid- and high frequency active sonar sources and explosive detonations.

The Taliban and Opium Industry Are Getting U.S. Billions -- Not So Much for the Rest of Afghanistan.

U.S. Representative Michele Bachmann (MN-6) has introduced a resolution that would bar the dollar from being replaced by any foreign currency.

UK: Farm bug found in hospitals -- New form of MRSA.

Department of Health and Human Services Approves Fictitious Medical Device Review Board Led by a Dead Dog -- Just how trustworthy are medical review boards that review and approve medical devices? In a Government Accountability Office (GAO) sting, investigators were able to invent and register a fictitious review board with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), complete with a fictitious panel of doctors and a canine president named "Truper Dawg" (named after a real pet dog that had long since passed away).

Someone has created a board game called Pandemic -- Players must work together, playing to their characters' strengths and planning their strategy of eradication before the diseases overwhelm the world with ever-increasing outbreaks.

The secret to relaxing? It's an open book -- Reading is the best way to relax, research has shown. It works better and faster than other methods to calm frazzled nerves such as listening to music, going for a walk or settling down with a cup of tea. Just six minutes can reduce stress levels by two-thirds.

Soldier recruitment inside jails exposed -- The 10News I-Team spent two years investigating military gang members, revealing their growing numbers among sailors, Marines and soldiers. Read More...

A mysterious illness is causing calves to bleed to death on German farms -- "Our calves from last summer looked like they had been beaten," says farmer Robert Meyboom, who is still shocked and perplexed today. "The animals' bodies were covered with drops of blood, and their eyes were bloodshot."

Music can Restore Vision after Stroke -- A new study by UK scientists from Imperial College London, the University of Birmingham and other institutions just published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science demonstrates sound can be used to facilitate healing. By listening to their favorite music, stroke patients with impaired vision were able to see better.

Food giants may be secretly adding toxic nanoparticles to your food -- Consumer magazine Choice says nanotechnology is already used in around 800 products.

Today in History March 27, 2009
1794 - The U.S. Congress and President Washington authorized the creation of the U.S. Navy.
1802 - The Treaty of Amiens was signed ending the French Revolutionary War.
1814 - U.S. troops under Gen. Andrew Jackson defeated the Creek Indians at Horshoe Bend in Northern Alabama.
1841 - The first steam fire engine was tested in New York City.
1866 - U.S. President Andrew Johnson vetoed the civil rights bill, which later became the 14th amendment.
1884 - The first long-distance telephone call was made from Boston to New York.
1904 - Mary Jarris "Mother" Jones was ordered by Colorado state authorities to leave the state. She was accused of stirring up striking coal miners.
1933 - About 55,000 people staged a protest against Hitler in New York City.
1933 - In the U.S., the Farm Credit Administration was authorized.
1946 - Four-month long strikes at both General Electric and General Motors ended with a wage increase.
1964 - An earthquake in Alaska killed 114 people and registered 8.4 on the Richter Scale.
1988 - The U.S. Senate ratified the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty.

MISSOURI SCRAPS M.I.A.C. REPORT -- By Chuck Baldwin

Missouri's Annual "Gun Rights Rally" Returns to The Capitol -- Please attend and show your support for our Second Amendment rights in the Show-Me State: Wednesday, April 1, 2009 - 9:00-11:00 AM - Jefferson City Missouri Capitol Rotunda, 1st Floor

Ron Paul’s bill to audit the Federal Reserve continues to gain momentum. H.R. 1207 now has 44 co-sponsors (as of 3/25/2009)!

YouTube: RON PAUL PETER SCHIFF LEW ROCKWELL JUDGE NAPOLITANO FREEDOM WATCH March 25, 2009

Marine’s Family Asks for Right to Sue Government for Medical Malpractice -- Marine Sgt. Carmelo Rodriguez fought in Iraq but lost his life fighting a different war. Cancer that went undiagnosed for nearly nine years killed the 29-year-old Rodriguez, of Ellenville, N.Y., said his sister, who testified about her family's story Tuesday before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Commercial and Administrative Law. "Carmelo wanted his story to be heard, even if his life couldn't be saved. He wanted to ensure that what happened to him would not happen to another service member," Ivette Rodriguez said.

Jim Cramer: Buy Gold -- Jim Cramer says the weak dollar is good for stocks and he lists multiple buying oportunities.

Florida Veterans Stream For Testing After H.I.V. Warning -- Hundreds of Veterans, some in fatigues, others in wheelchairs, streamed into the Miami Veterans Hospital on Wednesday to be tested for H.I.V. And Hepatitis after officials there announced that improperly cleaned colonoscopy equipment might have exposed them to infection.

North Dakota prepares for historic floods -- Officials predicted the Red River could crest as high as 43 feet this weekend -- two feet higher than forecasters had previously said.

Hundreds of Pa. juvenile convictions reversed -- Federal prosecutors charged Ciavarella and another Luzerne County judge, Michael Conahan, with taking $2.6 million in payoffs to put juvenile offenders in privately owned lockups. The judges pleaded guilty to fraud last month and face sentences of more than seven years in prison.

Military industrial complex prepares mass graves for US citizens

Caught on Tape: Bribes, Public Corruption -- Corrupt cops. Corrupt judges. Corrupt school superintendents. From Tennessee to suburban Washington, D.C. to Arkansas, investigators have found officials on the take. But in some cases, the FBI's caught the misdeeds on secretly recorded surveillance tapes. In one brazen crime in Tennessee, cameras caught then-Hamilton County Sheriff William Horace "Billy" Long taking thousands in bribes and embracing corruption to the core.

Barack Obama's internet 'town hall' meeting hijacked by cannabis questions -- US President Barack Obama had to answer a question about legalising cannabis after deciding to 'open up the White House to the American people' to a live question and answer session.
Related Article: Obama: Legalizing Pot Won’t Grow Economy -- Hotsheet did not expect President Obama to address the pot questions during the town hall, particularly after the event opened with a pair of relatively straightforward questions. But we were wrong: the president interrupted the event midway through to address the issue.

Latest Earthquakes -- Quakes Everywhere!

Missouri MIAC Documents Scandal Leads to Advisory on SPLC & ADL -- ALIPAC is issuing a national advisory to all local, state, and Federal law enforcement agencies and officers, along with all DHS Fusion Centers, a warning against any reliance upon faulty and politicized research issued by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) and Anti Defamation League (ADL).

Americans Largely Silent as Their Nation is Systematically Destroyed

Can Private Security Guards Act As Cops? -- They're private security guards, already on patrol, but they may soon have the powers of Chicago Police officers. As CBS 2 Chief Correspondent Jay Levine reports, the private security officers now on patrol on the city's Far South Side are expected to have their powers expanded as part of a citywide ordinance now being prepared.

THE SHERIFF - MORE POWER THAN THE PRESIDENT by Alan Stang -- The Battle for America will be decided in your county at your front door. If you act now, later you will not need to “fill your hand.”

Taser X12 stun gun freezes people from 88 ft away -- There's a new stun gun called the X12. And it's pretty much a freeze ray without the ice. The X12 fires a jolt through the air (wirelessly) through nonlethal bullets that can cut through clothing to paralyze a perpetrator within an effective range of 88 feet.

Lt. Gov., Highway Patrol leader criticize controversial militia report

Swiss banks ban top executive travel -- Switzerland’s private banks have started to ban their top executives from travelling abroad, even to neighbouring France and Germany, because of fears they will be detained as part of a global crackdown on bank secrecy.

Tasered Edmonton man died of excited delirium -- Alberta Justice says a man who was Tasered by Edmonton police in October died from a condition called excited delirium - not from the effects of being hit by the electronic stun gun.

Monsanto Planting Seeds in the White House? -- Apparently, President Obama is considering appointing Michael Taylor to head the new Food Safety Working Group. Who's Michael Taylor? Mr. Taylor is a lawyer who began his revolving door adventures as counsel to FDA. He then moved to King & Spalding, a private-sector law firm representing Monsanto, a leading agricultural biotechnology company. In 1991 he returned to the FDA as Deputy Commissioner for Policy, where he was part of the team that issued the agency's decidedly industry-friendly policy on food biotechnology and that approved the use of Monsanto's genetically engineered growth hormone in dairy cows.

Today in History March 26, 2009
1804 - The U.S. Congress ordered the removal of Indians east of the Mississippi to Louisiana.
1804 - The Louisiana Purchase was divided into the District of Louisiana and the Territory of Orleans.
1885 - Eastman Kodak (Eastman Dry Plate and Film Co.) produced the first commercial motion picture film in Rochester, NY.
1910 - The U.S. Congress passed an amendment to the 1907 Immigration Act that barred criminals, paupers, anarchists and carriers of disease from settling in
the U.S.
1937 - Spinach growers in Crystal City, TX, erected a statue of Popeye.
1951 - The U.S. Air Force flag was approved. The flag included the coat of arms, 13 white stars and the Air Force seal on a blue background.
1953 - Dr. Jonas Salk announced a new vaccine that would prevent poliomyelitis.
1962 - The U.S. Supreme Court supported the 1-man-1-vote apportionment of seats in the State Legislature.
1973 - Women were allowed on the floor of the London Stock Exchange for the first time.
1982 - Ground breaking ceremonies were held in Washington, DC, for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.
1998 - Unisys Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp. pay a $3.15 million fine for selling spare parts at inflated prices to the U.S. federal government.

Computer Virus Time Bomb Could Go Off April 1 - Conficker Virus -- The Conficker Internet worm could strike at infected computers around the world on April 1, a security expert warned Monday. Conficker is a sophisticated piece of malicious computer software, or malware, that installs itself on a Windows PC’s hard drive via specially written Web pages. It then conceals itself on a computer. Read More...
Another Related Article: Computer Virus -- Win32:Virut

Erica vonKleist will be on PBS TONIGHT, March 26, 2009 -- Click here to find your local PBS STATION AND TIME!
Related Article: Live From Lincoln Center|PBS

INCOME TAX: WHY WE HAVE IT by Alan Stang -- Question: Name for me a year, just one year, between 1776 and 1942, when the nation couldn’t function because we had no income tax. Can’t find one? Okay name a month, just one month, when the nation collapsed, couldn’t pay its bills, because we had no income tax. How about a week?

ABORTION SPIN ON MONTANA PLANE CRASH -- Family of Irving 'Bud' Feldkamp, Owner of the Nation's Largest Privately Owned Abortion Chain, Dies in Montana Plane Crash.
Related Article: Picture of The family of five killed with nine others when their ski trip plane nosedived into U.S. graveyard

Constitution Party Issues Missouri Travel Advisory -- The Constitution Party has issued a warning to Americans traveling within the state of Missouri that they might be considered a threat by law enforcement if they display certain bumper stickers on their cars. A recent report issued through the Missouri Information Analysis Center (MIAC) titled "The Modern Militia Movement" was released with the approval of Missouri Governor Jay Nixon and the Missouri State Police. It labels Americans with a variety of political beliefs as potential "militia members", "domestic terrorists" and "radicals".

Schwarzenegger Opens California Fairgrounds to Homeless Camp -- California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger said a make-shift tent city for the homeless that sprang up in the capital city of Sacramento will be shut down and its residents allowed to stay at the state fairgrounds.

Many U.S. Employers Cut 401(k) Matches -- Workers and companies are making lots of cuts in 401(k) contributions, at what is probably the worst time in terms of potential impact on long-term savings. "Do you spend less on groceries or do you save less in your 401(k)?" said Mr. Walper. "These are tradeoffs people are making."

New US report shows that Gardasil involved in far higher rates of adverse effects than meningococcal vaccine

States see IT, other delays costing them on Real ID -- Some state governments foresee high costs for implementing the Real ID Act because of delays by the Homeland Security Department in making technology and policy decisions for the national driver’s license standardization program, according to a new report from DHS Inspector General Richard Skinner.

Diebold Admits Voting System Flaws

Pentagon Plan to Regrow Limbs: Phase One, Complete -- The first phase of the Pentagon's plan to regrow soldiers' limbs is complete; scientists managed to turn human skin into the equivalent of a blastema — a mass of undifferentiated cells that can develop into new body parts. Now, researchers are on to phase two: turning that cellular glop into a square inch of honest-to-goodness muscle tissue.

Chuck Baldwin's response to the MAIC report -- "Ladies and gentlemen, we simply cannot allow this kind of police profiling to continue. I assure you, this phenomenon is not limited to the State of Missouri. Every state that has a "Fusion Center" is being fed this kind of nonsense on a regular basis."

Former CIA contractor & retired Army Special forces Lt Col. beaten to death while exercising with his wife -- William Bennett Was a Retired U.S. Army Special Forces Lieutenant Colonel.

Porton Down veterans had raised death rates after chemical warfare tests -- Veterans of Ministry of Defence tests at Porton Down in the UK involving chemical warfare agents such as sarin, lewisite and sulphur mustard had a higher mortality rate in subsequent years.

Psychiatry Still Uses Electroshock Therapy on Children -- A recent article published in the Melbourne, Australia paper Herald Sun has drawn attention to the ongoing psychiatric practice of using electroshock therapy on children as young as four years of age.

YouTube: Geithner Seeks New Powers Over Financial Co's. -- Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner asked Congress on Tuesday for broad new powers to regulate nonbank financial companies whose collapse could jeopardize the economy. AP's Jerry Bodlander reports. (March 24)

YouTube: Daniel Hannan MEP: The devalued Prime Minister of a devalued Government -- Daniel Hannan, MEP for South East England, gives a speech during Gordon Brown´s visit to the European Parliament on 24th March, 2009. Read Daniel´s blog at www.hannan.co.uk Daniel Hannan, MEP for South East England, gives a speech during Gordon Brown´s visit to the European Parliament on 24th March, 2009.

YouTube: The Anatomy of a Right-Wing Conspiracy Campaign

YouTube: Cavuto Nabs British PEM Daniel Hannan for First Chat, Pt 1 -- Neil Cavuto - he managed to snag the first exclusive interview with British PEM who ripped British PM Gordon Brown a new one over stimulus spending and bankrupting their country.

YouTube confirms website blocked in China -- YouTube confirmed Tuesday its website was being blocked in China, although the California firm offered no explanation for why Chinese authorities were barring access to the popular video-sharing service.

Save the Big Banks, Trash the Dollar by Gary North

How Rummy Almost Blew Afghanistan

'Violent sex' ad led to murder of WABC newsman George Weber, confesses teen -- An emotionally disturbed 16-year-old (above) confessed to the murder of WABC newsman George Weber.

How Much Can You Save with Your Own Garden? -- Has anyone ever kept track of what their garden produced in a given year and the calculated the economic value of their harvest? A couple did this year and calculated that the net economic value (not the health, environmental, gastronomic, psychological, or social value) was roughly $2150. Take a look at the data...

Just Released: Obama’s Gun Ban List -- Gun bans will impact our freedoms under search and seizure, due process, confiscated property, states’ rights, free speech, right to assemble and more, in addition to the Second Amendment. The Democrats current gun-ban-list proposal (final list will be worse). "Remember, the first step in establishing a dictatorship is to disarm the citizens."

Stiglitz anticipates new world order -- Professor Joseph Stiglitz opens the Credit Suisse conference by warning that the world can no longer rely on the US consumer, cautioning against weak policy responses and signalling a decline of the US dollar. Policymakers are focusing too much on the costs of fiscal stimulus packages, rather than their benefits, said Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel laureate and former chief economist at the World Bank, on the opening morning of the Credit Suisse Asian Investment Conference in Hong Kong yesterday.

Construction workers hit hard during tax season -- A LOT OF CONSTRUCTION WORKERS ARE FORCED TO USE A LAST RESORT TO PAY THEIR TAXES THIS YEAR. THE APRIL 15TH DEADLINE TO FILE YOUR TAXES IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER. BUT MANY CONSTRUCTION WORKERS ARE LESS CONCERNED ABOUT THE DEADLINE, AND MORE WORRIED ABOUT HOW THEY'RE GOING TO PAY WHAT THEY OWE.

Bill Samsel: Music for the resistance -- His debut album on Brimstone Records label will be released this month. Promotes NWO awareness.

UK: Now Big Brother targets Facebook -- Millions of Britons who use social networking sites such as Facebook could soon have their every move monitored by the Government and saved on a "Big Brother" database.

Senate Rubber Stamps National Enslavement Bill -- The Senate last night rubber stamped a nightmare domestic draft bill that legislates mandatory national service and creates an “army” of at least 7 million civilian enforcers working at the the behest of the government, while also containing language that threatens to ban free speech and the right to protest.

Today in History March 25, 2009
0421 - The city of Venice was founded.
1669 - Mount Etna in Sicily erupted destroying Nicolosi. 20,000 people were killed.
1776 - The Continental Congress authorized a medal for General George Washington.
1900 - The U.S. Socialist Party was formed in Indianapolis.
1902 - Irving W. Colburn patented the sheet glass drawing machine.
1911 - In New York City, 146 women were killed in fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company in New York City. The owners of the company were indicted on
manslaughter charges because some of the employees had been behind locked doors in the factory. The owners were later acquitted and in 1914 they were ordered
to pay damages to each of the twenty-three families that had sued.
1941 - The first paprika mill was incorporated in Dollon, SC.
1947 - John D. Rockefeller III presented a check for $8.5 million to the United Nations for the purchase of land for the site of the U.N. center.
1954 - RCA manufactured its first color TV set and began mass production.
1965 - Martin Luther King Jr. led a group of 25,000 to the state capital in Montgomery, AL.

Anti-American Defamation League --  Schedule of Upcoming Extremist Events: 2009 Extremism in Florida - click on the Florida State which lists Three Pillars of Tyranny Right-wing extremist conference focusing on government conspiracies. Among invited speakers are Joe Banister, Tommy Cryer, Pat Shannan, Dave Von Kleist, Jack McLamb, Greg Dixon, Ted Gunderson, and Michael Badnarik.

'Fusion Centers' Expand Criteria to Identify Militia Members -- Do you like Ron Paul or oppose abortion? You may be a member of a militia, according to a new report by a government information collection agency.

YouTube: Geithner Grilled on Goldman Sachs -- Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner found himself on the defensive Tuesday, trying to assuage Rep. Maxine Waters about the role Wall Street behemoth Goldman Sachs played in the lead-up to the federal bailout.

Why we should bring back the Gold Standard

Steve Vaus - Patriot rocker revives call to 'take America back' -- Steve Vaus, whose patriotic anthem "We Must Take America Back" got him blacklisted by the recording industry 17 years ago, has re-recorded the song with updated lyrics for 2009 – and, this time, he believes, not even a radio station boycott can silence his haunting and inspirational track.

Now we have a bill to bail out the newspaper industry -- With many U.S. newspapers struggling to survive, a Democratic senator on Tuesday introduced a bill to help them by allowing newspaper companies to restructure as nonprofits with a variety of tax breaks.

When America Ruled The World -- America has squandered the human sacrifice, blood, sweat and tears of two generations in less than seventy years. We have been an independent country for 226 years. From 1783 until 1946 was an unrelenting upward trajectory for the beacon of the free world. Read More...

Thirteen die after clostridium difficile outbreak at hospital -- C. diff is the major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis, an infection of the intestines. The bacterium, which lives in the gut, multiplies when doses of antibiotics disturb the natural balance of germs in the body - causing severe complications for the elderly and those already suffering a serious illness.

Going Abroad to Find Affordable Health Care -- Mr. Schreiner is what’s known in the health care world as a “medical tourist.” No longer covered under his former employer’s insurance and too young to qualify for Medicare, Mr. Schreiner has a private health insurance policy with a steep $10,000 deductible. Not wanting to spend all of that on the $14,000 his operation would have cost stateside, he paid only $3,900 in hospital and doctor’s costs.

Schenectady mayor considers options, martial law over police woes -- Five Schenectady police officers recently accused of everything from driving drunk to beating up a man are leading city officials to look at taking drastic action to fix a department tainted by the few who may have acted illegally.

Americans choosing herbal remedies over prescriptions to save money -- According to the Associated Press, sales of herbal medicines have improved as the economy has gotten worse.

Anaheim police surveillance of poor may be illegal -- Anaheim police routinely scour city records of families receiving federal rental assistance to look for links to crime suspects, a practice that critics say amounts to placing the poor under illegal surveillance.

H.R. 1388: Obama’s Youth Brigade Conscripts Would Be Prohibited from “Organizing or Engaging in Protests” or Participating in a Variety of Religious Activities

Insurers offer to stop charging sick people more -- The health insurance industry offered Tuesday for the first time to curb its controversial practice of charging higher premiums to people with a history of medical problems.

Scientists Monitor Swarm of Calif. Quakes -- There has been a swarm of earthquakes in one area of Southern California that scientists in Pasadena are watching closely, with the latest quake hitting this morning.

Incredible blizzard reports, tornado radar -- Yesterday's blizzard in the Northern Plains was pretty extreme. Rapid City, South Dakota tells the story well - the wind gusts there have been over 60 mph for more than 24 hours, while the temperature has fallen from freezing to 22 degrees F.

'Nano Sized' GPS Tracking Device - The Next Best Thing To An Implanted GPS Tracker -- Demand for tiny GPS Trackers has spread from police and military investigators to soccer moms wanting to keep an eye on family members. Lightning GPS , the primary supplier of covert GPS Tracking to military and law enforcement is moving aggressively to meet this demand.

Madoff's Prison Number a Lottery Hit in NY -- Wall Street swindler Bernard Madoff is a lucky charm for one New York City construction worker. Queens resident Ralph Amendolaro says he saw Madoff's prison number in a newspaper and had a good feeling so he played the last three digits of it in the state lottery's Numbers game. It hit March 15, paying $1,500.

Farmers on Hunger Strike Against GMOs in Poland -- The fasting ladies, supported by other members of the Coalition, have been protesting in front of the Ministry of Agriculture in Warsaw.

Florida: Drywall has material that can emit corrosive gas -- Strontium sulfide, a material that can emit corrosive gases in moist air, was found at trace levels in testing of Chinese-made drywall, the Florida Department of Health said.

Tamiflu Resistant H1N1 Vaccine Failures Raise Concerns -- Deb Brandt, a physician assistant at Rapid City Medical Center's Urgent Care, said that on Wednesday, the clinic checked in 106 people in 11 hours. There were cases of strep, mono and plenty of influenza. Three other Rapid City clinics report a similarly busy schedule. Brandt said about half of her patients who tested positive for influenza had their shots, but "most of the flu shots were early."

Czech government ousted -- The Czech government collapsed Tuesday after losing a parliamentary no-confidence vote over its handling of the economic crisis.

Severe Droughts Now Hitting China: Food Production Plummets -- A severe drought in northern China has left millions of people and animals without drinking water and dealt a major blow to the nation's grain crops.

Cold Fusion Proven True by U.S. Navy Researchers -- Will Oppression of this Science be Repeated?

Can cops demand to take your photo? -- Two years ago, a Pennsylvania man was thrown in jail for 160 days for refusing to allow police to take his picture.

Tiny peanut company in New Jersey fights back against FDA tyranny! -- In a telephone interview with ABC News, company owner Jacob Moradi insisted his products were safe and said a recall would drive him out of business. "They are asking me to commit suicide based on presumption. They have shown no proof. We have begged them," Moradi said. "They have no proof that anyone got sick from eating whole redskin peanuts roasted in oil."

YouTube: Petstar Einstein -- The Talking Parrot.

Today in History March 24, 2009
1720 - In Paris, banking houses closed due to financial crisis.
1765 - Britain passed the Quartering Act that required the American colonies to house 10,000 British troops in public and private buildings.
1828 - The Philadelphia & Columbia Railway was authorized as the first state owned railway.
1880 - The first "hail insurance company" was incorporated in Connecticut. It was known as Tobacco Growers’ Mutual Insurance Company.
1883 - The first telephone call between New York and Chicago took place.
1898 - The first automobile was sold.
1906 - In Mexico, the Tehuantepec Istmian Railroad opened as a rival to the Panama Canal.
1920 - The first U.S. coast guard air station was established at Morehead City, NC.
1932 - Belle Baker hosted a radio variety show from a moving train. It was the first radio broadcast from a train.
1988 - Former national security aides Oliver L. North and John M. Poindexter and businessmen Richard V. Secord and Albert Hakim pleaded innocent to Iran-Contra charges.
1995 - The U.S. House of Representatives passed a welfare reform package that made the most changes in social programs since the New Deal.
1999 - NATO launched air strikes against Yugoslavia (Serbia, Montenegro, Kosovo and Vojvodina). The attacks marked the first time in its 50-year history that NATO attacked a sovereign country. The bombings were in response to Serbia's refusal to sign a peace treaty with ethnic Albanians who were seeking independence for the province of Kosovo.

We Will Shut Down the Army Experience Center at Franklin Mills Mall in Philadelphia on May 2, 2009 -- Video games offer the perfect segues between childhood innocence and institutionalized killing. That's why the Army opened the Army Experience Center, a one-of-a-kind, 14,500-square-foot "virtual educational facility" in August of 2008. Although the Army says it's not about recruiting, all 20 soldiers stationed at the mall are active duty recruiters.

Undercover Officers Taught to Create Crimes Against Christians and Constitutionalists -- What could retired ATF Agent Gene Rightmyer, seminar host, have said that literally caused Carolyn (last name withheld) to gasp on the second day of the International Undercover Agents “Homegrown Extremists” Seminar, held in Nashville, Tennessee August 16-20, 1999?

Vets face an HIV risk from hospital pumps -- Thousands of veterans who underwent certain routine medical procedures at Miami's VA Medical Center are at risk of being infected with hepatitis or HIV, the hospital announced Monday.

Guardsmen train for urban conflict -- Camp Clark, Mo. -- More than 200 soldiers from the newly formed 1st Battalion, 138th Infantry Regiment of the Missouri Army National Guard came to Camp Clark from across the state on Saturday, March 14, to take part in training in several different combat scenarios. This is the first time Missouri has had an infantry unit in more than 35 years.

U.S. Treasury Announces $1 Trillion Toxic-Debt Plan -- The U.S. Treasury announced a plan aimed at financing as much as $1 trillion in purchases of distressed assets to help a financial system that is “still working against recovery.” 

Unknown worms found in tap water in Moscow region -- In the Russian town of Pavlov Posad , situated 25 miles from Moscow, people have to drink water with worms in it. Even after repeated chlorination parasites did not die. Russian Agency for Health and Consumer Rights told reporters that the worm species were not known to science yet.

YouTube: Ron Paul on Glenn Beck -- Part 2 - 07/29/2008 - (audio only)

YouTube: Part 2: Ron Paul on Glenn Beck Radio -- 03/23/2009 -- (Audio Only)

YouTube: Ron Paul on Glenn Beck -- Part 1 -  07/29/2008 (audio only)

YouTube: Jay Rockefeller "Internet should have never been invented" -- Rockefeller: Internet is "Number One National Hazard" According to the great-grandson John D. Rockefeller, nephew of banker David Rockefeller, and former Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller.

State considers return to gold, silver dollars -- A bill being considered in the Montana Legislature blasts the Federal Reserve's role in America's money policy and permits the state to conduct business in gold and silver instead of the Fed's legal tender notes.

Every single bat may soon be dead -- Every single bat in the United States may soon be dead. White-nose syndrome (WNS), a mysterious fungus that kills bats wiped out about 90 percent of the bats in Connecticut this past winter and the syndrome is now headed to Alabama and other southern states.

The Collapse of ’09 by Gerald Celente -- The "Panic of ’08" will be followed by "The Collapse of ’09." In 2008, when the world’s largest financial firms and equity markets crumbled, Wall Street’s woes preoccupied the media.

Tests Show Chinese Drywall Contains “Volatile” Sulfur Compounds -- Usually, drywall is manufactured in the United States, but a shortage during the housing boom years prompted many builders to buy drywall from China. The Florida Health Department has received more than 100 complaints about drywall that has polluted homes with a putrid, “rotten-egg” smell. Fumes from the drywall have also caused metals - like air conditioning coils - to corrode, and the material has also been suspected of causing respiratory and sinus problems among people living with it.

Mexico offers $2 million for top drug lords -- Mexico has put a US$2-million price tag on the head of each of the country's 24 top drug lords. Some 8,000 people have been killed in the last two years as gangs battle each other for territory and fight off a countrywide law enforcement crackdown.

Half of us have one month of cash cushion if laid off -- A MetLife study released last week found that 50 percent of Americans said they have only a one-month cushion — roughly two paychecks — or less before they would be unable to fully meet their financial obligations if they were to lose their jobs. More disturbing is that 28 percent said they could not make ends meet for longer than two weeks without their jobs.

Red meat raises risk of all kinds of death says study -- People who eat the most red meat and the most processed meat have the highest overall risk of death from all causes, including heart disease and cancer, U.S. researchers reported on Monday.

"BigDogs" -US unleashes metal beast robot in Afghanistan -- AMERICA has called out its new weapon to send into battle in Afghanistan - a terrifying pack of robotic "BigDogs".

Gov. fires corruption 'target' chair Rubin from Penn Turnpike Commission -- Pennsylvania Governor Edward Rendell says in a letter released this morning that he is removing the chairman of the Turnpike Commission, Mitchell Rubin as a commissioner because of his links to corruption. Rubin had asked Rendell for a "leave of absence" from the chairmanship, but instead the Governor today fired him from the Commission.

EPA/Dupont deal exposed thousands to Teflon -- In a March 10 consent agreement with E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (DuPont), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) lowered its standard for drinking water contamination with the toxic Teflon chemical perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from 0.5 parts per billion (ppb) to 0.4 ppb for people in the vicinity of a DuPont plant in Parkersburg, West Virginia.

'No living thing left' as Tonga volcano erupts -- A volcanic eruption close to the South Pacific nation of Tonga has destroyed rich birdlife and vegetation, leaving a wasteland of black ash and tree stumps, witnesses said Friday.

G20 warned unrest will sweep globe -- A wave of social and political unrest could sweep through the world's poorest countries if G20 leaders fail to come to their aid, the World Bank warns today, as new research says the credit crunch will cost developing countries $750bn (£520bn) in lost output and drive millions more into poverty.

Alaska: Fifth explosion rocks Mount Redoubt volcano -- An erupting Mount Redoubt exploded again this morning at 4:31 a.m. -- its fifth and strongest discharge yet -- sending an ash cloud to new heights, the Alaska Volcano Observatory reported.

China urges new reserve currency -- China called for the creation of a new currency to eventually replace the dollar as the world's standard, proposing a sweeping overhaul of global finance that reflects developing nations' growing unhappiness with the U.S. role in the world economy.

Severe Allergic Reactions to Hair Dyes are on the Rise -- Hair-color company products containing the chemical PPD are still causing disfiguring and painful reactions, even death.

UK: Mother given parking ticket for stopping to revive disable son -- A mother who says she stopped her car on a pavement to revive her profoundly disabled son, was given a £100 parking ticket.

UK: Council uses spy plane with thermal imaging camera to snoop on homes wasting energy -- The aircraft takes images of homes and businesses, with those losing the most heat showing up as red, while better insulated properties appear blue.

Who is who in the chemical poison industry -- (pdf file)

Today in history March 23, 2009
1513 - Don Juan Ponce de Leon, a former governor of Puerto Rico, discovered Florida. He claimed the land for Spain.
1775 - American revolutionary Patrick Henry declared, "give me liberty, or give me death!"
1806 - Explorers Lewis and Clark, reached the Pacific coast, and began their return journey to the east.
1836 - The coin press was invented by Franklin Beale.
1839 - The first recorded use of "OK" [oll korrect] was used in Boston's Morning Post.
1858 - Eleazer A. Gardner patented the cable streetcar.
1880 - John Stevens patented the grain crushing mill. The mill increased flour production by 70 percent.
1901 - Dame Nellie Melba, revealed the secret of her now famous toast.
1903 - The Wright brothers obtained an airplane patent.
1912 - The Dixie Cup was invented.
1920 - Britain denounced the U.S. because of their delay in joining the League of Nations.
1933 - The German Reichstag adopted the Enabling Act. The act effectively granted Adolf Hitler dictatorial legislative powers. .
1942 - During World War II, the U.S. government began evacuating Japanese-Americans from West Coast homes to detention centers.
1957 - The U.S. Army sold the last of its homing pigeons.
1967 - Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. called the Vietnam War the biggest obstacle to the civil rights movement.
1998 - The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that term limits for state lawmakers were constitutional.

Military demands details on soldiers' private guns -- A military commander at Fort Campbell in Kentucky demanded his soldiers give him the registration numbers of any guns they own privately and then reveal where they are stored.

Kroft to Obama: Are you punch-drunk? -- Why all the laughter?

George Galloway visits the US but Canada informs him "You're not welcome"

The real US financial crisis has yet to begin -- The worst has yet to come. With a loss of confidence in the US financial system, creditors and investors are dumping dollar-denominated instruments. They are willing to cut losses. The US banks, who issue the instruments, have to take their debts back. Since they do not have the liquidity because the credit market has already ground to a halt, they can only rely on the Federal Reserve. As a result, the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve will continue to balloon.

"True" Unemployment Rate -- So why is this annualized state data important? Because it gives us a deeper view of what states are taking the brunt of this economic downturn.

Federal Reserve plan stuns investors -- The Federal Reserve on Wednesday stunned investors by announcing plans to buy $300bn of US government debt, triggering a plunge in bond yields and the dollar.

CDC Takes Closer Look at Gardasil and Paralysis -- "I'm troubled by the complexities of all of this. How will the CDC ever be able to know whether there's a true connection between Gardasil and ALS if this disease is so rare? And just how much evidence is needed?"

Police arrest 300 in Paris riots over economic crisis -- MORE than 300 rioters were arrested in Paris as baton-wielding gangs clashed with police in protests over President Nicolas Sarkozy's handling of the financial crisis.

WaMu sues FDIC for more than $13 billion over forced sale -- Washington Mutual, the bankrupt, seized and "under investigation" financial institution which saw some operations forcibly sold off to JPMorgan Chase in 2008, is suing the agency that guarantees Americans' deposits, and that agency is running low on funds.

One Soldier's Tale of How War Drove Him Crazy -- "When it got really bad, I dumped 5 tons of sand into my basement to remind me of Afghanistan." Six years later, he is still being careful, still working on feeling safe enough to be a little visible in the world after his tour in Afghanistan.

U.S. Navy vessels collide in Strait of Hormuz -- The nuclear-powered submarine Hartford and the amphibious transport dock New Orleans were heading into the Persian Gulf at the time. Fifteen sailors are slightly injured.

Economy causing horse crisis: People 'giving up their animals' -- "People have lost their homes, their jobs, their hope," she said. "And they are giving up their animals."

Thousands Protest ‘Wasteful’ Washington Spending At Orlando Tea Party -- People among the thousands on hand said they want to decide where their hard-earned money goes instead of the "elitist politicians" in Washington using it to buy votes, doling it out to special interest groups and pork barrel projects.

Seeds - How to Criminalize Them -- Ah, such a little paragraph, and so much evil packed in it. Notice they mention harvesting, sorting and storage operations? Notice they never mention seeds but they are precisely what those words cover.

X-Rays, MRI Scans Useless for Back Pain -- "If there are no warning signs pointing to a serious cause of low back pain, imaging is almost never helpful to guide treatment. Routine imaging of patients with low back pain is a waste of health care resources," wrote Michael Kochen of the University of Goettingen, Germany, in an accompanying editorial.

Yellow metal shines -- Gold prices have spiked again on the back of the US's move to massive qualitative easing measures but is the traditional view of the yellow metal changing?

G20 protesters 'will try to bring London to standstill' -- Next month's G20 summit will present an "unprecedented" challenge as up to 2,000 protesters attempt to bring London to a standstill, the Metropolitan Police admitted yesterday.

Bird flu, Ebola lab accidents raise biosecurity fears in Europe -- Lab accidents involving bird flu and Ebola viruses have increased biosecurity fears in Europe, where public health experts say research on dangerous pathogens needs to be more strictly monitored.

Turmeric Improves Cell Health, Boosts Immune System, Protects Against Cancer and More -- Turmeric is one of the main ingredients in many curries. In India, it has been used for centuries to help treat various health conditions while, at the same time, it is also widely used in Chinese Medicine. In a recent study conducted at Michigan University, it was found that curcumin, the bright yellow pigment present in turmeric, can help boost cell health by improving the behavior of their membranes.

Media covers anti war protest, but ignores tea parties!

VIDEO: Aaron Russo -- Mad As Hell - 1:30:06 - Mar 21, 2007

NAIS Stinks.com -- No How, No Way.

Oathkeepers: Guardians of the Republic

737 U.S. Military Bases = Global Empire

Now Larry Silverstein wants a bailout -- The private developer redeveloping the World Trade Center site in New York City has asked the government for financial assistance, the Wall Street Journal reported on Saturday.

WABC radio newsman George Weber found stabbed to death in Brooklyn apartment -- The bloody body of Weber, a passionate fan of the city who spent a decade doing local news on WABC morning radio, was found just after 9 a.m. when he didn't show up for work.

Zale may be the fourth large jewelry to sink into financial obscurity over the next 24 months -- As Finlay methodically roles out its "unannounced" plan for liquidation, its problems begin to spill over to Zale's beleaguered balance sheet. Read why Zale may be the fourth large jewelry to sink into financial obscurity over the next 24 months.

Effects of Mobile Phone Radio Frequency on the Structure and Function of the Normal Human Hemoglobin

Today in History March 20. 2009
0141 - The 6th recorded perihelion passage of Halley's Comet took place.
1616 - Walter Raleigh was released from Tower of London to seek gold in Guyana.
1760 - The great fire of Boston destroyed 349 buildings.
1816 - The U.S. Supreme Court affirmed its right to review state court decisions.
1852 - Harriet Beecher Stowe’s book "Uncle Tom’s Cabin," subtitled "Life Among the Lowly," was first published.
1865 - A plan by John Wilkes Booth to abduct U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was ruined when Lincoln changed his plans and did not appear at the Soldier’s Home near Washington, DC.
1885 - John Matzeliger of Suriname patented the shoe lacing machine.
1886 - The first AC power plant in the U.S. began commercial operation.
1933 - The first German concentration camp was completed at Dachau.
1991 - The U.S. forgave $2 billion in loans to Poland.
1997 - Liggett Group, the maker of Chesterfield cigarettes, settled 22 state lawsuits by admitting the industry marketed cigarettes to teenagers and agreed to warn on every pack that smoking is addictive.

Army Hospital May Have Spread Disease With Shared Insulin Pens -- More than 2,000 people may have been put at risk of AIDS and hepatitis by sharing insulin pens and cartridges in two Army hospitals, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said.

YouTube: Ron Paul on the bailout -- Ron Paul House Floor Extended remarks -The Federal Reserve, AIG, Congress, ... 03-19-09

YouTube: We The People Stimulus Package 

Tax Day Tea Parties expected to number more than 1,000 -- While WND has been tracking 170 individual tea parties across the nation, one group has announced it is planning rallies in 1,000 cities and towns on April 15. The American Family Association, or AFA, is coordinating 1,000 Taxed Enough Already, or TEA, parties to be held at 12 p.m. in front of city halls across the nation.

HR 875 Could Result in Arrest, Imprisonment of CEOs of Processed Food Companies (if enforced) -- The health-conscious community is rightly concerned over the pending passage of HR 875, the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2009, which hammers small family farms with a whole new level of tyranny and oppression.

China tests J&J baby shampoo for unsafe chemicals -- Johnson & Johnson baby shampoo and other products were among dozens from different manufacturers listed in a report issued March 12 by the U.S.-based health and environmental activist group Campaign for Safe Cosmetics as containing formaldehyde or 1,4-dioxane. Johnson & Johnson issued a statement reassuring customers and accusing the report of unnecessarily alarming parents.

Kidde Recalls to Replace Fire Extinguishers Due to Failure to Operate -- THE U.S. CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION, IN COOPERATION WITH THE FIRM NAMED BELOW, TODAY ANNOUNCED A VOLUNTARY RECALL OF THE FOLLOWING CONSUMER PRODUCT. CONSUMERS SHOULD STOP USING RECALLED PRODUCTS IMMEDIATELY UNLESS OTHERWISE INSTRUCTED. NAME OF PRODUCT: KIDDE XL FIRE EXTINGUISHERS

Citigroup May Spend $10 Million for Executive Suite -- Citigroup expects to pay at least $3.2 million for basic construction such as wall removal, plumbing and fire safety. By the time architect’s fees and expenses such as furniture are added, the tally for the offices at the bank’s Park Avenue headquarters will be at least three times as high, according to a person familiar with the project who declined to be identified because he’s not authorized to comment. Citigroup said the project will help it save money over time.

U.S. Olympic Committee lays off 54 employees to cut costs -- The United States Olympic Committee (USOC) has laid off 54 employees in an effort to reduce its operating budget in the current tough economic climate.

I'll be there for you: Bush offers to help President Obama -- As offers of help go, it's a safe bet this will be one Barack Obama won't accept any time soon. Still, though: George Bush wants him to know that he's there if he needs him.

House adopts plan for 'volunteer' corps -- The U.S. House of Representatives has approved a plan to set up a new "volunteer corps" and consider whether "a workable, fair, and reasonable mandatory service requirement for all able young people" should be developed.

Obama to plant organic vegetable garden on White House lawn -- First lady Michelle Obama is scheduled to break ground Friday on a new garden near the fountain on the South Lawn that will supply the White House kitchen. Such a White House garden has been a dream of noted California chef Alice Waters, considered a leader in the movement to encourage consumption of locally grown, organic food. She has been appealing for change through the taste buds since the 1960s. Hey...but wouldn't that violate HR 875???? (Thanks Nina)!!!

Text of H.R. 1388 -- Generations Invigorating Volunteerism and Education Act.

Health care workers to wear badges to monitor hand sanitizing compliance -- Epidemiologists and computer scientists at the University of Iowa have collaborated to create a new low-cost, green technology for automatically tracking the use of hand hygiene dispensers before healthcare workers enter and after they exit patient rooms. This novel method of monitoring hand hygiene compliance, which is essential for infection control in hospitals, was released today at the annual meeting of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA).

Deadly airborne fungus could devastate Africa -- The world's leading crop scientists have warned that a deadly airborne fungus could devastate wheat harvests and lead to famines and civil unrest over significant regions of central Asia and Africa.

Lyme disease cases growing in California -- The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 20,000 cases in the United States annually in recent years but said the actual number could be as high as 10 times that amount. Cases of reported Lyme disease are growing in California and around the country.

Homeland Security, FEMA may be split up -- Separating the Federal Emergency Management Agency from the Department of Homeland Security would take away resources the struggling agency needs to continue improving, congressional lawmakers, disaster experts and others said Tuesday.

Pushing Ecstasy on PTSD victims -- The drug MDMA -- better known as the illegal recreational drug "Ecstasy" -- may help people with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recover, a Norwegian research team suggests.

Computer programmer from Finland has lost finger replaced with USB drive -- Jerry Jalava from Helsinki, Finland, has built the special prosthetic finger to use as computer storage for his photos, movies and other useful files.

US bailout banks owe millions in taxes: lawmakers -- Thirteen recipients of funds under a 700-billion-dollar US banking rescue plan were guilty of a potential crime in obtaining the money while still owing federal taxes, lawmakers said Thursday.

Kentucky counties fined $400,000 for posting Ten Commandments -- Two southern Kentucky counties where officials posted copies of the Ten Commandments in courthouses have been ordered by a federal judge to pay more than $400,000 to the American Civil Liberties Union and citizens who successfully challenged the displays.

Local police want better sharing of intelligence -- Nonfederal law enforcement officials today told a House subcommittee how homeland security intelligence could be refined for their needs. Also, civil-liberties advocates told that same panel how current homeland security intelligence efforts pose a threat to citizens’ rights.

U.N. panel says world should ditch dollar -- A U.N. panel will next week recommend that the world ditch the dollar as its reserve currency in favor of a shared basket of currencies, a member of the panel said on Wednesday, adding to pressure on the dollar.

20 Things You Didn't Know About Time -- The beginning, the end, and the funny habits of our favorite ticking force.

Today in History March 19, 2009
1628 - The Massachusetts colony was founded by Englishmen.
1822 - The city of Boston, MA, was incorporated.
1831 - The first bank robbery in America was reported. The City Bank of New York City lost $245,000 in the robbery
1900 - U.S. President McKinley asserted that there was a need for free trade with Puerto Rico.
1903 - The U.S. Senate ratified the Cuban treaty, gaining naval bases in Guantanamo and Bahia Honda.
1918 - The U.S. Congress approved Daylight-Saving Time.
1954 - The first rocket-driven sled that ran on rails was tested in Alamogordo, NM.
1968 - Students at Howard University students seized an administration building.
1979 - The U.S. House of Representatives began broadcasting its daily business on TV.
1998 - The World Health Organization warned of tuberculosis epidemic that could kill 70 million people in next two decades.

Death Threats For AIG Executives -- In testimony before Congress the current head of AIG, Edward Liddy, testified today that several death threats have been made against some of those individuals that received the obscene bonus payments by way of yet another bailout of the criminals that caused this mess in the first place.

Army Investigating How and Why Troops Were Sent Into Alabama Town After Murder Spree -- The U.S. Army has launched an inquiry into how and why active duty troops from Fort Rucker, Ala., came to be placed on the streets of Samson, Ala., during last week's murder spree in that tiny South Alabama community. The use of the troops was a possible violation of federal law.

House Passes Volunteerism Bill -- Some opponents are strongly criticizing the legislation, calling it expensive indoctrination and forced advocacy.

MRI Lie Detection to Get First Day in Court -- Defense attorneys are for the first time submitting a controversial neurological lie-detection test as evidence in U.S. court. In an upcoming juvenile-sex-abuse case in San Diego, the defense is hoping to get an fMRI scan, which shows brain activity based on oxygen levels, admitted to prove the abuse didn't happen.

Obama secretly ends program allowing pilots to carry guns on planes -- President Obama is quietly ending the federal firearms program, risking public safety on airlines in the name of an anti-gun ideology.

Blackwater still works for U.S. in Iraq -- "Why would you continue to use Blackwater when the Iraqi government has banned the highly controversial company and there are other choices?" asked Melanie Sloan, executive director of the non-partisan Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington.

France hit by new wave of nationwide protests -- Workers demand government do more to fight effects of economic crisis!

The gold rush is on at a party near you -- Neighbors gather for food, conversation and a little buying and selling.

Burt's Bees, Tom's of Maine, Naked Juice: Your Favorite Brands? Take Another Look -- They May Not Be What They Seem!

Frankincense oil -- a wise man's remedy for bladder cancer.

Doctors 'too reliant on prescribing drugs' -- Doctors are too reliant on prescribing drugs for heart disease at the expense of helping their patients to lead healthier lives, a new study suggests.

Shakeups loom at Pennsylvania & Florida turnpikes -- In Orlando the release of a grand jury paper about shenanigans inside the local toll expressway authority threaten the tenure of CEO Mike Snyder and longtime general contractor PBS&J, while in Harrisburg PA the Governor Ed Rendell has said he's investigating whether he has the legal authority to remove Turnpike Commission chairman Mitchell Rubin.

Webster's dictionary redefines 'marriage' -- One of the nation's most prominent dictionary companies has resolved the argument over whether the term "marriage" should apply to same-sex duos or be reserved for the institution that has held families together for millennia: by simply writing a new definition.

Soldiers pledge to refuse disarmament demands -- An invitation to soldiers and peace officers across the United States to pledge to refuse illegal orders – including "state of emergency" orders that could include disarming or detaining American citizens – has struck a chord, collecting more than 100,000 website visitors in a little over a week and hundreds of e-mails daily.

Stethoscopes Infected with Deadly Bacteria -- Dr. Mark Merlin, chair of the Mobile Intensive Care Unit Advisory Committee for the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, is urging medical services providers to clean their stethoscopes more frequently to prevent transmission of MRSA infections.

Scientists grow diabetes drug in tobacco plants -- Scientists have found a healthy use for tobacco after breeding genetically modified plants containing a medicine that could stop type 1 diabetes.

Reduce Exposure to Dangerous Bisphenol A -- Because of growing research about the dangers of BPA and public outrage at its widespread use, the House of Representatives and the Senate announced legislation on March 13, 2009 to ban use of BPA in all food and beverage containers. Already some manufacturers such as Playtex and Gerber have announced that they will not use BPA in their baby products. Read the ways to lessen your exposure...

Western military forces turning inward in anticipation of domestic unrest -- As the growing world-wide economic crisis deepens, military forces from Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom are preparing to meet angry citizens on the street. The economic crisis - and the public outrage it is causing - is at the forefront of intelligence agencies and military forces in the western world.

Gun Advocates Ready for Battle on Federal Assault Weapons Ban -- Attorney General Eric Holder is using the drug violence in Mexico to "confuse and mislead" Americans in an attempt to reinstate the expired federal assault weapons ban, gun advocates say.

Feds undercut ammo supply -- Responding to two Democratic senators representing outraged private gun owners, the Department of Defense announced last night it has scrapped a new policy that would deplete the supply of ammunition by requiring destruction of fired military cartridge brass.

Mobile prison cells will cage criminals on the beat -- Police will be given mobile cells to target offenders in crime hotspots and shopping centres under plans by the Conservatives to free up officers.

Today in History March 18, 2009
1818 - The U.S. Congress approved the first pensions for government service.
1834 - The first railroad tunnel in the U.S. was completed. The work was in Pennsylvania.
1850 - Henry Wells & William Fargo founded American Express.
1909 - Einar Dessau of Denmark used a short wave transmitter to become the first person to broadcast as a "ham" operator.
1911 - North Dakota enacted a hail insurance law.
1922 - Mohandas K. Gandhi was sentenced to six years in prison for civil disobedience in India. He served only 2 years of the sentence.
1939 - Georgia ratified the Bill of Rights amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
1942 - The third military draft began in the U.S. because of World War II.
1963 - The U.S. Supreme Court handed down the Miranda decision concerning legal council for defendants.
1968 - The U.S. Congress repealed the requirement for a gold reserve.
1981 - The U.S. disclosed that there were biological weapons tested in Texas in 1966.

Obama Received a $101,332 Bonus from AIG -- Senator Barack Obama received a $101,332 bonus from American International Group in the form of political contributions according to Opensecrets.org. The two biggest Congressional recipients of bonuses from the A.I.G. are - Senators Chris Dodd and Senator Barack Obama.

AIG hires rent a cops to protect bankers form "mob effect" -- A tidal wave of public outrage over bonus payments swamped American International Group yesterday. Hired guards stood watch outside the suburban Connecticut offices of AIG Financial Products, the division whose exotic derivatives brought the insurance giant to the brink of collapse last year. Inside, death threats and angry letters flooded e-mail inboxes. Irate callers lit up the phone lines. Senior managers submitted their resignations. Some employees didn't show up at all.

Citigroup CEO awarded $10.8 million -- Citigroup Inc awarded Chief Executive Vikram Pandit $10.82 million of compensation in 2008, a year when the government propped up the bank with $45 billion of capital.

ALERT: Truckers warned about U.S.-Mexico border violence -- The Highway ISAC issued an “unclassified” alert the first week of March detailing the increase in violence among Mexican drug cartels – on both sides of the border. The main area of concern highlighted in the alert is in and around Ciudad Juarez.

Mexico to impose sanctions on US exports -- A long-simmering trade dispute boiled over into sanctions on Monday after Mexico said it would raise tariffs on $2.4bn of US exports in retaliation for ending a pilot programme to allow Mexican trucks on American roads.

Investigative reporter Seymour Hersh describes 'executive assassination ring' -- At a “Great Conversations” event (MP3) at the University of Minnesota last night, legendary investigative reporter Seymour Hersh may have made a little more news than he intended by talking about new alleged instances of domestic spying by the CIA, and about an ongoing covert military operation that he called an “executive assassination ring.”

Feds encourage cities to apply for police funds -- Attorney General Eric Holder on Monday encouraged cash-strapped mayors and other city officials to apply for their share of $1 billion in new grant money to pay for 5,500 more police officers.

Medication…A Distant Memory by Mike Tawse -- Our friend Mike Tawse is now in his 4th year free from ‘toxic cocktails’, popularly known as prescription medication. Read more about Mike Tawse at http://miketawse.ws

Peace Activists Arrested at Pentagon -- Seven peace activists were arrested this morning as they attempted to meet with Secretary of Defense Robert Gates at the Pentagon. The peace activists are associated with the National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance (NCNR), and their visit followed a letter to Gates demanding all military forces be withdrawn from Iraq and Afghanistan, and that bombings of Pakistan immediately cease. The committed activists from New Jersey, Ohio, Virginia, and the District of Columbia were arrested by Pentagon Police after they strenuously requested to meet with Gates.

Drywall from China blamed for problems in homes -- A leading U.S. home builder, Lennar, and a Chinese drywall manufacturer, Knauf Plasterboard Tianjin, say tests show the gases given off by the drywall pose no health hazards. Florida regulators and the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission are investigating.
Related Article: Drywall from China blamed for problems

Goodbye needle, hello smoothie -- Instead of a dreaded injection with a needle, someday getting vaccinated against disease may be as pleasant as drinking a yogurt smoothie.

A solemn walk through HR 875 -- The Food Safety Modernization Act which 'makes it illegal to grow your own garden;' This would mean a 'goodbye to farmers markets,' would result in the 'death of organic farming.' Read More...
Related Link: H.R. 875: 2009-2010 Food Safety Modernization Act of 2009

Lose your property for growing food? -- Some small farms and organic food growers could be placed under direct supervision of the federal government under new legislation making its way through Congress. Food Safety Modernization Act: House Resolution 875.

For 30 years, Camp Lejeune exposed troops to chemicals -- Something was very wrong with the drinking water at Camp Lejeune. Before wells were closed at the base in 1984 and 1985, tests showed drinking water was contaminated by toxic chemicals, including very high concentrations - more than 40 times the current EPA limit - of industrial solvents trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene. The Marines encourage anyone who served at Lejeune or worked there during that time to participate in a registry.

The American Legion Strongly Opposed to President's Plan to Charge Wounded Heroes for Treatment -- The leader of the nation's largest veterans organization says he is "deeply disappointed and concerned" after a meeting with President Obama today to discuss a proposal to force private insurance companies to pay for the treatment of military veterans who have suffered service-connected disabilities and injuries. The Obama administration recently revealed a plan to require private insurance carriers to reimburse the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in such cases.

Live H5N1 virus placed in Baxter vaccine sent to 18 countries -- The company that released contaminated flu virus material from a plant in Austria confirmed Friday that the experimental product contained live H5N1 avian flu viruses.
Related Article: Connecting The H5N1 Dots

U.S. Air Force Study Proposed 2009 Influenza Pandemic in 1996 by Kurt Nimmo -- On June 17, 1996, the U.S. Air Force released Air Force 2025, “a study designed to comply with a directive from the chief of staff of the Air Force to examine the concepts, capabilities, and technologies the United States will require to remain the dominant air and space force in the future.” In the unclassified study, the College of Aerospace Doctrine, Research, and Education at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama posed several “fictional representations of future situations/scenarios” likely to arise.

Vaccines as Biological Weapons? Live Avian Flu Virus Placed in Baxter Vaccine Materials Sent to 18 Countries -- Avian flu viruses being inserted into vaccine materials isn't fiction. It's happening right now. Deerfield, Illinois-based pharmaceutical company Baxter International Inc. has just been caught shipping live avian flu viruses mixed with vaccine material to medical distributors in 18 countries.

Israeli army ordered to devise Iran war -- As Israeli talks of war on Iran gain momentum, Israel's military Chief of Staff says the army must prepare for a military aggression. 

Bank of England Votes Unanimously to Print Money -- Bank of England policy makers voted unanimously to start printing as much as 75 billion pounds ($105 billion) in money to fight the recession as they made their final cut in the benchmark interest rate.

Shopper's guide to pesticides in food -- This is a .pdf file format.

Judge upholds almond pasteurization law -- A federal judge has rejected challenges to a law requiring mandatory pasteurization of almonds to reduce risk of salmonella contamination. (so now we get to have dead nuts.)

New Strain of Bird Flu Poses Threat -- Even as governments and health experts around the world have been focusing on the threat of a pandemic of the H5N1 strain of avian flu, another dangerous strain known as H9N2 has gone mostly ignored, according to a study published in the journal PLos ONE.

Banned hyperlinks could cost you $11,000 a day -- The Australian communications regulator says it will fine people who hyperlink to sites on its blacklist, which has been further expanded to include several pages on the anonymous whistleblower site Wikileaks.

Traffic may Trigger Heart Attacks -- If you spend time stuck in traffic as you commute to your job, you might want to consider working closer to home or finding an easier route to get to the office. The reason? It could be a way to lower your risk of a heart attack. Read More...

O'odham: Militarization and border abuses accelerate -- Mike Flores, Tohono O’odham, questioned why President Obama has not taken any action to halt the militarization of the border and human rights abuses by US Border Patrol agents, or the construction of the US border wall that is violating all federal laws, including laws designed to protect the environment and Native American remains...


Happy St. Patrick's Day!
Today in History March 17, 2009
0461 - Bishop Patrick, St. Patrick, died in Saul. Ireland celebrates this day in his honor.
1756 - St. Patrick's Day was celebrated in New York City for the first time. The event took place at the Crown and Thistle Tavern.
1766 - Britain repealed the Stamp Act that had caused resentment in the North American colonies.
1910 - The Camp Fire Girls organization was founded by Luther and Charlotte Gulick. It was formally presented to the public exactly 2 years later.
1941 - The National Gallery of Art was officially opened by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt in Washington, DC.
1942 - Douglas MacArthur became the Supreme Commander of the United Nations forces in the Southwestern Pacific.
1961 - The U.S. increased military aid and technicians to Laos.
1970 - The U.S. Army charged 14 officers with suppression of facts in the My Lai massacre case.
1989 - A series of solar flares caused a violent magnetic storm that brought power outages over large regions of Canada.
1999 - A panel of medical experts concluded that marijuana had medical benefits for people suffering from cancer and AIDS

Court: No need for state to check prez' eligibility -- Judge throws out complaint brought on behalf of Keyes.

MISSOURI STATE POLICE THINK YOU AND I ARE TERRORISTS by Chuck Baldwin -- The report, he said, "instructs the Missouri police to be on the lookout for supporters displaying bumper stickers and other paraphernalia associated with the Constitutional, Campaign for Liberty, and Libertarian parties."

Adderall: Deadly Drug Treats Bogus Disease -- The drug Adderall is linked with heart attack and sudden death in children and young adults according to a newly released study at the New York Medical College of Family Medicine.

Many people are raising their own food to save -- From seed producers and greenhouse growers to retailers, all are reporting booming sales. All attribute it largely to family financial issues.

Judge says its okay for Navy to spray recruits with banned chemical -- The Navy can spray recruits in the eyes with pepper spray, even though it has been linked to death and is banned during warfare by international law, a federal judge ruled Friday.

VIETNAM: End of the Road for Agent Orange Victims? -- Where can Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange get justice? Probably nowhere, after the United States Supreme Court refused to hear, this month, a final appeal by Vietnamese plaintiffs against chemical giants Dow and Monsanto.

China: Importers need to share blame for emissions -- Countries buying Chinese goods should be held responsible for the heat-trapping gases released during manufacturing in China, one of its top officials said Monday. The argument could place an even greater burden on the U.S. for reducing pollution blamed for global warming.

US downed Iranian drone over Iraq -- A U.S. military spokesman confirmed on Monday that U.S. forces shot down an unmanned Iranian aircraft in Iraqi airspace last month.

University warns of disease problems if California rice seed imported -- there is a quarantine on seed imports from California because of bakanae disease, according to Dr Rick Cartwright, University of Arkansas. "This is a seed-borne disease of rice common in Asia, and first noted in California in 1999. It is not known to be present in Arkansas or other southern rice states," Cartwright said.

Cash In A Mattress? No, Gold In The Closet -- With prices setting new records, the worried wealthy are piling up ingots in home safes.

Stimulus Package Aims To Spur Adoption Of E-Health Records -- The federal economic stimulus bill signed into law last month contains several financial incentives that could get laggard doctors and hospitals to adopt IT-based tools that can cut costs and save lives.

Thousands Rally Downtown Against Government Spending -- Thousands of Tri-State residents gathered Sunday on Fountain Square in downtown Cincinnati to voice their opposition to government spending bills recently signed by President Barack Obama. The group called itself the Cincinnati Tea Party, modeled after the Boston Tea Party of 1773.

War is Breaking Out in Mexico -- Will it Unravel the United States We Know?

Handheld, Semiautomatic Sales Increase -- It's unclear how effective President Barack Obama's policies will be in reversing the nation's economic slide, but since his election he has proven to be a one-man stimulus package for one sector of the economy — gun sales.

Rioting in Ireland -- Tensions flared in Northern Ireland yesterday when masked gangs attacked police with petrol bombs, bricks and stones after a dissident republican was arrested in connection with the murder of two soldiers last week.

New Bill Will Extend Sunset Clauses Of The Patriot Act -- The criminal terrorists in the federal government are seeking now to extend sunset clauses found in the USA Patriot Act and the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Act of 2004.

Florida legislator wants random drug tests for the unemployed -- A Florida legislator has proposed that random drug-testing also be applied to those receiving unemployment insurance, justifying it as a way to make state funds go further.

Corporate meltdown leaves renters in limbo -- As panicked renters in Arizona began holding public meetings to explore whether they could walk away from leases, recoup security deposits or sue, it became clear that the scale of the mess was far larger than they had realized. Read More...

Kucinich Requests Investigation into “Executive Assassination Ring” -- Congressman Dennis Kucinich (D-OH) Friday sent a letter to Chairman Edolphus Towns of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee requesting an immediate investigation into allegations made by the investigative reporter Seymour Hersh that the White House operated an ‘executive assassination ring’ that circumvented Congressional oversight.

President Obama has nominated Dr. Margaret Hamburg to become the new Commissioner of the FDA and Dr. Joshua Sharfstein as the Deputy Commissioner -- Hamburg, 53, is a bioterrorism expert. She was an assistant health secretary under President Bill Clinton and helped lay the groundwork for the government's bioterrorism and flu pandemic preparations. Sharfstein, 39, is a pediatrician who has challenged the FDA on the safety of over-the-counter cold medicines for children.

Bob Schultz injured in auto crash! -- the crash happened on I-10 Westbound in Houston, Texas. Latest update is Bob is out of hospital and is resting at a hotel.

Catastrophic Fall in 2009 Global Food Production -- After reading about the droughts in two major agricultural countries, China and Argentina, I decided to research the extent other food producing nations were also experiencing droughts. This project ended up taking a lot longer than I thought. 2009 looks to be a humanitarian disaster around much of the world.

Bentonite Clay Provides a Safe and Effective Detox by Perry A -- The most common symptoms of toxic buildup within the body are mental dullness, aching-stiff joints, gas and bloat, high acidity, digestive problems with the stomach and colon, acid reflux and fatigue. Read More...

DOD Ends Sale of Expended Military Brass to Remanufactures -- It has come to my attention that the Department of Defense has issued a directive that all expended military brass (fired cases) will now be shredded and sold for scrap material, rather than resold by Government Liquidators LLC to the civilian market for remanufacture. Read More...

Brain Scanners Know Where You've Been -- The brain's center of memory and navigation, once considered too disorganized to decode, may soon be unlocked. Using a brain scanner, researchers were able to determine the location of people standing in a virtual room from the activity in their brains.

The International Monetary Fund poised to print billions of dollars in 'global quantitative easing' -- The International Monetary Fund is poised to embark on what analysts have described as "global quantitative easing" by printing billions of dollars worth of a global "super-currency" in an unprecedented new effort to address the economic crisis.

Today in History March 16, 2009
1836 - The Republic of Texas approved a constitution.
1871 - The State of Delaware enacted the first fertilizer law.
1915 - The Federal Trade Commission began operation.
1926 - Physicist Robert H. Goddard launched the first liquid-fuel rocket.
1950 - Congress voted to remove federal taxes on oleomargarine.
1964 - U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson submitted a $1 billion war on poverty program to Congress.
1988 - Indictments were issued for Lt. Colonel Oliver North and Vice Admiral John Poindexter of the National Security Council for their involvement in the Iran-Contra affair

A.I.G. to Pay $100 Million in Bonuses After Huge Bailout -- Despite being bailed out with more than $170 billion from the Treasury and Federal Reserve, American International Group Inc. is preparing to pay about $100 million in bonuses to executives in the same business unit that brought the company to the brink of collapse last year.

US Mint Suspends Production of More Gold and Silver Coins -- The United States Mint has officially announced the suspension of another slate of gold and silver products. The affected products are 2009 dated American Gold and Silver Eagle coins produced for collectors. These coins are considered collectible versions of the bullion coins.

Cuba, Venezuela could host Russian bombers -- A Russian air force chief said Saturday that the country could base some strategic bombers in Cuba or on an island offered by Venezuela, the Interfax news agency reported, but a Kremlin official quickly said the military had been speaking only hypothetically.

YouTube: 'Worst economic collapse ever' -- In 2009 were going to see the worst economic collapse ever, the Greatest Depression, says Gerald Celente, U.S. trend forecaster. He believes its going to be very violent in the U.S., including there being a tax revolt.

Fed-up Americans mobilize: More than 150 tea parties -- A revolution is brewing as American patriots and advocates of the free-market system unite in protest against out-of-control government spending – with a wildfire movement of more than 150 nationwide tea parties.

Pakistan clamps down on protests amid fresh fears of a military coup -- Pakistan's army was put on stand-by yesterday to deal with growing demonstrations against the government, which are due to reach a climax in the capital, Islamabad, tomorrow. Divisions within President Asif Ali Zardari's administration were underlined by the abrupt resignation of a senior minister.

Big Pharma CEO Fakes Cancer while Pill-Pushing Doctor Fakes Clinical Trial Results for Bextra, Effexor and Celebrex -- The culture of deceit and fraud that permeates conventional medicine became even more apparent today with the announcement that Howard Richman, the former vice president of a pharmaceutical company named Biopure, faked his own cancer and even impersonated a doctor in order to convince a federal judge that he was dying from colon cancer.

California Warns of Layoffs at Schools -- The State Department of Education estimates that preliminary notices will be given to 26,500 teachers and an additional 15,000 bus drivers, janitors, secretaries and administrators.

Pentagon plans blimp to spy from new heights -- The Pentagon said Thursday that it intends to spend $400 million to develop a giant dirigible that will float 65,000 feet above the Earth for 10 years, providing unblinking and intricate radar surveillance of the vehicles, planes and even people below.

Chief justice publicly accepts World Net Daily's eligibility petition -- A California attorney lobbying the U.S. Supreme Court for a review of Barack Obama's qualifications to be president confronted the chief justice yesterday with legal briefs and a WND petition bearing names of over 325,000 people asking the court to rule on whether or not the sitting president fulfills the Constitution's "natural-born citizen" clause.

Anesthesiologist Faked Data in 21 Studies -- A pioneering anesthesiologist has been implicated in a massive research fraud that has altered the way millions of patients are treated for pain during and after orthopedic surgeries.

Boom-years borrowing hits churches -- Add houses of worship to the list of casualties of the mortgage crisis. Foreclosures and delinquencies for congregations are rising, according to companies that specialize in church mortgages. With credit scarce, church construction sites have gone quiet, holding shells of sanctuaries that were meant to be completed months ago. Congregants have less money to give, and pastors who stretched to buy property in the boom are struggling to hold onto their churches.

New Study Shows Skin Cream May Cause Skin Tumors -- Common commercial skin care products may increase users' risk of contracting skin cancer, according to a paper by researchers from Rutgers University and published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

University of Miami physicist develops battery using new source of energy -- Researchers at the University of Miami and at the Universities of Tokyo and Tohoku, Japan, have been able to prove the existence of a "spin battery," a battery that is "charged" by applying a large magnetic field to nano-magnets in a device called a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ).

New Army Weapon Aims to Fry Gadgets, People -- The U.S. Army is developing Hybrid munitions that would give warheads the added punch of an e-bomb that can "destroy and disable electronic systems and their operators" all in one blast.

Death penalty For Rioters -- "I am writing from India where a recent disclosure regarding the reintroduction of the death penalty for rioters on ratification of the Lisbon Treaty is receiving much debate."

Maine Town Passes Ordinance Asserting Local Self-Governance and Stripping Corporate Personhood -- The citizens of Shapleigh, Maine voted at a special town meeting to pass a groundbreaking Rights-Based Ordinance, 114 for and 66 against. This revolutionary ordinance give its citizens the right to local self-governance and gives rights to ecosystems but denies the rights of personhood to corporations.

Soldier 'Mutiny' Against Obama -- AN active duty Army officer in Iraq is refusing to recognize President Barack Obama as Commander-in-Chief - and hundreds more soldiers are lining up to follow suit, sources reveal in a shocking world exclusive!

A Major Development for the Future of Dietary Supplements -- The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) presented a report to Congress last week, titled Dietary Supplements: FDA Should Take Further Action to Improve Oversight and Consumer Understanding. A link to the full 70+ page report appears at the end of this article. Read a few of the highlights...

Bills seek ban on BPA in all food containers -- Leaders from the House and Senate introduced legislation yesterday to establish a federal ban on bisphenol A in all food and beverage containers.

Mosquito laser gun offers new hope on malaria -- AMERICAN scientists are making a ray gun to kill mosquitoes. Using technology developed under the Star Wars anti-missile programme, the zapper is being built in Seattle where astrophysicists have created a laser that locks onto airborne insects.

FBI Concerned Homegrown Terror Threat Growing -- Members of the Twin Cities' thriving Somali community say they are being questioned by the FBI as it investigates whether some young men are being "radicalized" in Minnesota and recruited to fight with terror groups in their homeland.

Too expensive to own a firearm...a form of gun control -- HB0687, which is before our state legislators, would make any who owns firearms carry $1,000,000 in liability insurance.

Economy spurs home garden boom -- With the recession in full swing, many Americans are returning to their roots — literally — cultivating vegetables in their backyards to squeeze every penny out of their food budget.

The amazing benefits of bananas -- A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy. Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world's leading athletes. It also prevents a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.

Papaya is the Health Fruit of Angels -- Papaya is called fruit of the angels by Conquistadors because of its heavenly taste. In its prime, it is a cerise-orange colored, unbelievably juicy fruit with an aroma to match its heavenly taste. Not only is papaya beautiful, fragrant and luscious, it is amazingly healthful!

Freedom in the 50 States: Index of Personal and Economic Freedom -- This paper presents the first-ever comprehensive ranking of the American states on their public policies affecting individual freedoms in the economic, social, and personal spheres.

Federal Register -- Dept of Treasury rules for Suspicious Activity reports.

Today in History March 13, 2009

0607 - The 12th recorded passage of Halley's Comet occurred.
1519 - Cortez landed in Mexico.
1777 - The U.S. Congress ordered its European envoys to appeal to high-ranking foreign officers to send troops to reinforce the American army.
1852 - The New York "Lantern" newspaper published the first "Uncle Sam cartoon". It was drawn by Frank Henry Bellew.
1868 - The U.S. Senate began the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson.
1877 - Chester Greenwood patented the earmuff.
1884 - Standard time was adopted throughout the U.S.
1902 - In Poland, schools were shut down across the country when students refused to sing the Russian hymn "God Protect the Czar."
1933 - U.S. banks began to re-open after a "holiday" that had been declared by President Roosevelt.
1964 - 38 residents of a New York City neighborhood failed to respond to the screams of Kitty Genovese, 28 years old, as she was stabbed to death.
1970 - Digital Equipment Corp. introduced the PDP-11 minicomputer.

YouTube: Gary Franchi Exposes Federal Reserve on PBS -- the local PBS station, KBDI, in Denver Colorado broadcast the groundbreaking expose, America: Freedom To Fascism to raise funds for the station.

Norton avoiding all questions about PIFTS.EXE -- There is a new fear on the Internet and its name is PIFTS.exe. This file has been that has caused such a stir only appears on systems with Norton Anti-Virus that have the most current update.

Vote Now: Give President Obama a grade -- If you were grading Barack Obama on his performance as president, what would he get?

Half of Americans Are Two Paychecks Away from Hardship -- Homeowners should have at least three months of mortgage payments saved up to protect themselves from a job loss. But a recent study by MetLife indicates that consumers don't have nearly enough of a financial cushion to keep them afloat should a job loss occur.

Congress still slated to get automatic pay hike -- Lawmakers guaranteed to get a raise, despite slumping economy.

Madoff’s new Manhattan home is very different -- Will live in jail cell the size of a walk-in closet while he awaits sentencing.

Obama racks up list of broken promises -- After giving his word to the American people on so many issues, Obama has yet to fulfill many commitments.

UN to investigate secret US jails -- The UN is to investigate the use of secret detention centres allegedly used by the CIA and other groups as part of US counter-terrorism efforts.

The multiple ways Monsanto is putting normal seeds out of reach -- Astounding article and take time to read the comments.

Confirmed: German shooter was on psychatric drugs -- The shooter was on psychiatric medications and then quit using them. This created a classic antidepressant withdrawal crisis which is exactly what leads to extreme acts of violence against self or others. As we reported in our previous story, virtually every school shooting that has taken place in the last two decades was carried out by those who either take psychiatric medications or are attempting to quit them.

Despite Legal Setback, Raw Almond Fight Continues -- Interested members of the organic community can make their voice heard by sending Mr. Obama and Secretary Vilsack a proxy-letter. Read More...

United States Cancer Statistics -- This Web-based report includes the official federal statistics on cancer incidence from registries that have high-quality data and cancer mortality statistics for each year and 2001–2005 combined.

New research study says looks & creditwothiness may go hand in hand -- New research suggests that a person's appearance may play a role in whether they are deemed trustworthy by financial lenders.

American adults flunk basic science -- A new national survey commissioned by the California Academy of Sciences and conducted by Harris Interactive reveals that the U.S. public is unable to pass even a basic scientific literacy test.

Census Hiring To Create 1.4 Million Jobs -- The census will put more than 1.4 million people on the federal payroll over the next year, making it the largest peacetime government jobs program ever, according to the Census Bureau.

GMO and Morgellon’s Disease -- Surviving the Middle Class Crash.

Wonder drug (statin) that stole my memory -- Statins have been hailed as a miracle cure for cholesterol, but little is known about their side effects. "Because the drug worked so well in reducing my cholesterol, it never occurred to me to think of statins as a feature in my memory loss."

Why are we lending money to other countries???? -- NBC correspondent Lisa Myers investigates banking titans that made overseas loans in wake of congressional hearing.

US warships head for South China Sea after standoff -- A potential conflict was brewing last night in the South China Sea after President Obama dispatched heavily armed American destroyers to the scene of a naval standoff between the US and China at the weekend.

U.S. Army Soldiers Deployed on the Streets of Samson, Alabama -- I was reading this Reuters piece about a mass shooting in Alabama when I noticed these photos: US Army Soldiers from Fort Rucker patrol the downtown area of Samson, Alabama after a shooting spree March 10, 2009.

FBI has one MILLION people on 'watch and stop' terror list -- People on the list are stopped from flying into America or subjected to intense questioning at border crossings before being allowed entry into the country.

Food Gardening to Go Up in 2009 -- More Americans are recognizing the benefits of growing their own produce, including improved quality, taste and cost savings.

Future Combat Systems, here and now -- This little robotic fellow in the foreground looks like he might have missed the casting call for Wall-E, but he actually has one of the featured roles in the U.S. Army's long-running Future Combat Systems drama.

China’s Premier Wen ‘Worried’ on Safety of Treasuries -- China, the U.S. government’s largest creditor, is “worried” about its holdings of Treasuries and wants assurances that the investment is safe, Premier Wen Jiabao said.

Wireless Tasers extend the long arm of the law -- The Taser XREP is an electrically charged dart that can be fired from up to 20 metres away with a 12-gauge shotgun. Upon impact, its barbed electrodes penetrate a victim's skin, discharging a 20-second burst of electricity to "distract, disorient and entice the subject to grab the projectile", says Taser. But grabbing the dart routes the shock through the hand, making it difficult to let go and spreading the pain further.

IContain Develops Anti-Theft Solution For Rent-To-Own Industry -- IContain has announced the debut of ICinside, a suite of RFID, cellular-assisted GPS anti-theft technology products developed specifically for the rent-to-own-industry.
 
Today in History March 12, 2009
1755 - In North Arlington, NJ, the steam engine was used for the first time.
1789 - The U.S. Post Office was established.
1889 - Almon B. Stowger applied for a patent for his automatic telephone system.
1894 - Coca-Cola was sold in bottles for the first time.
1904 - After 30 years of drilling, the tunnel under the Hudson River was completed. The link was between Jersey City, NJ, and New York, NY.
1906 - The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that corporations must yield incriminating evidence in anti-trust suits.
1933 - U.S. President Roosevelt presented his first presidential address to the nation. It was the first of the "Fireside Chats."
1985 - Former U.S. President Richard M. Nixon announced that he planned to drop Secret Service protection and hire his own bodyguards in an effort to lower
the deficit by $3 million.
2002 - U.S. homeland security chief Tom Ridge unveiled a color-coded system for terror warnings.

Hersh: 'Executive assassination ring' reported directly to Cheney -- Investigative reporter Seymour Hersh dropped a bombshell on Tuesday when he told an audience at the University of Minnesota that the military was running an "executive assassination ring" throughout the Bush years which reported directly to former Vice President Dick Cheney.

Secret State Police Report: Ron Paul, Bob Barr, Chuck Baldwin, Libertarians are Terrorists -- Alex Jones has received a secret report distributed by the Missouri Information Analysis Center (MIAC) entitled “The Modern Militia Movement” and dated February 20, 2009. A footer on the document indicates it is “unclassified” but “law enforcement sensitive,” in other words not for public consumption. A copy of the report was sent to Jones by an anonymous Missouri police officer.

IBM Scrutinized for Layoff Practices -- Some workers claim IBM is making layoffs in small numbers to avoid notification laws.

Credit agency names 283 US firms most likely to go bust -- US industrial companies such as Eastman Kodak, media firms such as Univision Communications and carmakers including Ford and General Motors have a 45% chance of going bust in the next 12 months, according to a report published today.

Banks were January net buyers of 1.1 million oz of gold -- Central banks, which have been net sellers of gold in recent years, were net buyers of an estimated 1.1 million oz in January, according to the latest Market Alert by the CPM Group, the New York-based metals consultancy. The world's central banks were both buyers and sellers, but the quantity bought outstripped what was sold.

Supreme Court Revives Antidepressant Lawsuits -- In the wake of last week’s Supreme Court decision that protected the rights of patients to sue drug makers for liability in state courts, two lawsuits are receiving particular attention. Bloomberg News reports that Pfizer and a GlaxoSmithKline PLC unit are being blamed for not warning that their antidepressants—Zoloft and Paxil—might provoke suicidal ideation and suicide in adults.

Limbaugh Republicans vs. The United States of America -- Limbaugh's "ditto heads," (who say "ditto for me" rather than think for themselves) are hoping for Obama's economics to fail and for the United States to sink into another Great Depression. But here's the Wall St. Journal quoting Fed. Chairman Bernanke—and remember, he's George Bush's man, not Obama's.

Failed Bank List -- The FDIC is often appointed as receiver for failed banks. This page contains useful information for the customers and vendors of these banks. This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership.

Iraq shoe thrower gets sentence of 3 years -- An Iraqi journalist who threw his shoes at George Bush, then-US president, has been given a three-year jail sentence after pleading not guilty to assaulting a foreign head of state.

Obama and US commander discuss military intervention in Mexico -- Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Admiral Michael Mullen briefed President Barack Obama over the weekend on the so-called drug war in Mexico and the prospect of increased US military involvement in the conflict south of the border.

Senate to Vote on Compromise Land Bill that Would Ban Guns -- GOA has just learned that after some backroom deals, the bill is headed to the floor WEDNESDAY MORNING, without any amendments to truly protect your Second Amendment rights on National Park Service (NPS) land.

40 - 45% of world's wealth destroyed in 18 months -- "Between 40 and 45 percent of the world's wealth has been destroyed in little less than a year and a half," Schwarzman told an audience at the Japan Society. "This is absolutely unprecedented in our lifetime."

Judge orders homeschoolers into public district classrooms -- A North Carolina judge has ordered three children to attend public schools this fall because the homeschooling their mother has provided over the last four years needs to be "challenged." The children, however, have tested above their grade levels – by as much as two years.

Churches outraged at state's interference -- Following widespread outrage from Roman Catholics, Connecticut lawmakers have postponed a highly anticipated public hearing over a state law that would dictate how local parishes organize their governing structures.

Wal-Mart to enter medical records digitization market -- US retail titan Wal-Mart is poised to enter the medical data market with the launch of a package that would help small doctor's practices to digitize their medical records.

Regulate armed robots before it's too late -- We are on the brink, and perhaps to some degree already over the edge, in one hugely important area: robotics.

Singapore's GIC sees more distress in markets -- An official from the Government of Singapore Investment Corp (GIC) said he expects more weakness in financial markets in the next 12-18 months, and recommended investors hold gold and other safe assets such as government bonds.

10 Best Uses for RFID Tags

Lakewood, Fort Lewis start police liaison program -- Fort Lewis has assigned a full-time military liaison police officer position to the Lakewood Police Department. Police Lt. Steve Mauer said the soldier won’t patrol with city officers, but will serve as a resource. Fort Lewis sent a pair of military police officers to get oriented with the Lakewood Police Department last week. They will split time in the single position.

New Mexico Senate President Sides With Top Aspartame Maker -- New Mexico Senate President sides with World's Largest Neurotoxic Carcinogenic Artificial Sweetener Maker, Ajinomoto, to Kill Consumer Protection Request of FDA to Rescind Aspartame.

Seed companies have a bumper crop of customers -- Seed sales are up 20 to 30 percent at wholesalers such as Irish Eyes Garden Seeds in Ellensburg because of the bad economy and worries about genetically modified crops. Burpee, the world's largest seed company, says it's selling thousands of a $10 "Money Garden" package that it says will grow $650 worth of vegetables.

Thousands line up for food in Indiana -- A caravan of semi-trailers is visiting small cities and towns across America hit hard by the economic crisis. No area in Indiana has been hit harder than Elkhart County, where the jobless rate skyrocketed to 18.3 percent in January.

Probiotics Found to Block Pneumonia in Critically Ill Patients -- Probiotics are just as effective as conventional antiseptics at suppressing pneumonia-causing bacteria in the mouths of critically ill patients, according to a study conducted by researchers from University Hospital in Lund, Sweden, and published in the journal Critical Care. Probiotics are live microorganisms that provide a health benefit inside the body.

U.S. gets D for adult mental health care -- The nation does a poor job in the ways it serves its mentally ill population, earning a D, according to a report card issued Wednesday by an advocacy group.

Parrots teach man to speak again -- A US fireman who lost his power of speech in a traffic accident has been taught to speak again by parrots.

Today in History March 11
1702 - The Daily Courant, the first regular English newspaper was published.
1824 - The U.S. War Department created the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Seneca Indian Ely Parker became the first Indian to lead the Bureau.
1847 - John Chapman 'Johnny Appleseed' died in Allen County, Indiana. This day became known as Johnny Appleseed Day.
1888 - The "Blizzard of '88" began along the U.S. Atlantic Seaboard shutting down communication and transportation lines. More than 400 people died.(March 11-14)
1901 - U.S. Steel was formed when industrialist J.P. Morgan purchased Carnegie Steep Corp. The event made Andrew Carnegie the world's richest man.
1927 - The Flatheads Gang stole $104,250 in the first armored-car robbery near Pittsburgh,
1947 - The DuMont network aired "Movies For Small Fry." It was network television's first successful children's program.
1964 - U.S. Senator Carl Hayden broke the record for continuous service in the U.S. Senate. He had worked 37 years and seven days.
1998 - The International Astronomical Union issued an alert that said that a mile-wide asteroid could come very close to, and possibly hit, Earth on Oct. 26, 2028. The next day NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced that there was no chance the asteroid would hit Earth

Feds want more personal info for flight reservations -- Passengers making airline reservations soon will be required to provide their birth date and their sex in addition to their names as part of aviation security enhancements the 9/11 Commission recommended. The information provided at the time seats are booked must exactly match the data on each traveler's ID. The new program will be called Secure Flight.

Sea levels rising twice as fast as predicted -- Melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica force UN scientists to issue dramatic warning.

Alabama Gunman Kills Nine People -- The victims include members of his own family as well as people that he shot at random on the street, at a convenience store and other locations, authorities said. The suspect, who eventually killed himself inside a metals plant, was shooting an automatic assault rifle and possibly other guns.

YouTube: The Venus Project On Fox News 7 -- The Venus Project (featured in Zeitgeist Addendum) makes it onto FOX News.

1.6M refrigerators are recalled because of fire hazard -- Maytag said Tuesday that it has voluntarily recalled about 1.6 million refrigerators sold under a variety of names due to an electrical problem that could create a fire hazard.

Iran lacks nuclear bomb fuel says US officials -- Iran has yet to decide whether to build a nuclear bomb and currently lacks the weapons-grade highly enriched uranium needed to do so, top US intelligence officials told lawmakers on Tuesday.

Coming to America: Chinese Looking for Bargains -- New Wave of Overseas Buyers Shop for Prime Real Estate at Rock Bottom Prices.

Have a Buck? Buy a House! -- A dollar doesn't buy much these days. But in Detroit, it can buy you a house. In many neighborhoods, homes that were fetching $75,000 just three years ago are now selling for ten cents on the dollar or less.

Lowe's Building Supply Near Cleveland Sports Signs in Chinese & Russian -- ~ A Sign of Things to Come?

California raw almonds must be treated, judge rules -- In a blow to organic almond producers and handlers, the Washington, D.C.-based judge rejected challenges to pasteurization requirements designed by the Almond Board of California. The Agriculture Department formally imposed the rules in March 2007, setting off sparks.

Monsanto Whistleblower Says Genetically Engineered Crops May Cause Disease

Pelosi Made Repeated Requests for Military Aircraft, Documents Show -- Representatives for Judicial Watch, which obtained e-mails and other documents showing the requests, say House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has treated the Air Force as her "personal airline."

“IRS Investigative Materials” -- A Guide to Internal Revenue Service Material Available to Other Federal Agencies.” Obtained, scanned, and posted by The Memory Hole, it doesn’t appear to be otherwise online. Printed and sent to Federal Depository Libraries in 1988, it’s the kind of publication that the IRS no longer makes available to the public.

1300 girls in UK experience side effects from HPV vaccine such as paralysis & epilepsy -- Doctors have reported that girls aged just 12 and 13 have suffered paralysis, convulsions and sight problems after being given the vaccine.

Senate Approves $410 Billion Bill to Fund Federal Government -- The Senate gave final approval last night to a $410 billion spending bill to fund most of the federal government for the remainder of the year after overcoming a resilient Republican opposition and several Democratic defections.

Undercover Animal Rights Investigator -- Through people like "Pete," a 20-something undercover animal rights investigator who, armed with a hidden camera, surreptitiously got a job in 2006 at an Ohio hog farm. Pete" refuses to reveal his actual identity, saying only that he has legally changed his name twice so he can continue to get hired by unknowing slaughter houses, farms and other facilities suspected of animal abuse. Read More...

Operation Garden Plot -- In this document signed by the Secretary of the Army, is hereby assigned as DOD Executive Agent for civil disturbance control operations. Under Plan 55-2 he is to use airlift and logistical support, in assisting appropriate military commanders in the 50 states, District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and US possessions and territories, or any political subdivision thereof. The official name of this project is called "Operation Garden Plot."

Lemon Grower Tracks Worker Productivity -- A new RFID system enables Argenti Lemon to track the quantity of lemons its employees pick, as well as the fruit's location as it is processed and shipped.

Oregon veteran disabled by Iraq's 'Agent Orange' -- The same Oregon Guard soldiers who went into Iraq without adequate body armor or up-armored Humvees face another dubious first: exposure to hexavalent chromium, which greatly increases their risk of cancer and other diseases. It was in the orange and yellow dust spread over half the Qarmat Ali water treatment plant by fleeing Saddam supporters. Read More...

YouTube: Grocery Stores Begin to Close in California -- PREPARE NOW - STOCK UP ON NON-PERISHABLES AND WATER.

One in 50 US kids is homeless says report -- One in 50 American children is homeless and the economic crisis hitting the United States will make the problem worse, a report released Tuesday said. "Without a voice, more than 1.5 million of our nation's children go to sleep without a home each year," said the "America's Young Outcasts" report by the National Center on Family Homelessness.

Imagine By Ron Paul -- Imagine for a moment that somewhere in the middle of Texas there was a large foreign military base, say Chinese or Russian. Imagine that thousands of armed foreign troops were constantly patrolling American streets in military vehicles. Imagine they were here under the auspices of "keeping us safe" or "promoting democracy" or "protecting their strategic interests." Read More...

VIDEO: NEED GUNS, AMMO???? -- "It takes about 5 min. to watch this, but it is well worth the time. It gives you a good idea of what we are up against."

VIDEO: FOR GUN LOVERS ONLY!! -- Family Day in Alabama !!

Digital Angel Announces Active Tags for Livestock -- Ranchers and other producers and handlers of livestock will soon have a new tool at their disposal for tracking the locations of animals in real time, and with greater precision. RFID vendor Digital Angel has announced a new, battery-powered animal identification tag, known as the r.Tag, that the company says can be read from up to 100 feet away.

St. John's Children's Hospital Deploys RFID to Protect Children -- The Springfield, Ill., medical center is using 100 RFID-enabled bracelets and a network of readers to secure three floors of its six-story facility.

Today in history March 10

1776 - "Common Sense" by Thomas Paine was published.
1804 - The formal ceremonies transferring the Louisiana Purchase from France to the U.S. took place in St. Louis.
1876 - Alexander Graham Bell made the first successful call with the telephone. He spoke the words "Mr. Watson, come here, I want to see you."
1903 - Harry C. Gammeter patented the multigraph duplicating machine.
law forbidding late-night work for women.
1971 - The U.S. Senate approved an amendment to lower the voting age to 18.
1991 - "Phase Echo" began. It was the operation to withdraw 540,000 U.S. troops from the Persian Gulf region.
1994 - White House officials began testifying before a federal grand jury about the Whitewater controversy.
1998 - U.S. troops in the Persian Gulf began receiving the first vaccinations against anthrax

4 chemicals used in consumer products slapped with toxic label -- "The (Canadian) federal government on Friday declared four chemicals widely used in paints, varnishes, stains and industrial cleaners as toxic to human health, paving the way for their possible ban in products."

15,00 descend on Fullerton California to protest higher taxes -- Shouting “Off with their heads!” and “Heads on a stick!” over 15,000 people from all over California descended on downtown Fullerton for the Revolt, Recall, Repeal rally to protest over $50 billion in tax increases in the state of California and to begin a recall effort against the governor and many state legislators. Freeway off ramps heading into Fullerton had to be shut down because so many people were heading to the event and police services were stretched thin, according to a sergeant handling traffic duty at the event.

Gun Makers and Retailers Post Strong Sales Increases -- The economy might be tanking, but firearm sales are going great!

Supreme Court Dismisses Lawsuits Against Gun Industry -- The Supreme Court has turned away pleas by New York City and victims of gun violence to revive lawsuits accusing the firearms industry of selling guns with the knowledge they could be sent to illegal markets.

Air Force 2025 study from 1996 proposed 2009 influenza pandemic -- On June 17, 1996, the U.S. Air Force released Air Force 2025, “a study designed to comply with a directive from the chief of staff of the Air Force to examine the concepts, capabilities, and technologies the United States will require to remain the dominant air and space force in the future.” In the unclassified study, the College of Aerospace Doctrine, Research, and Education at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama posed several “fictional representations of future situations/scenarios” likely to arise.

McClatchy newspapers to lay off 1600 -- U.S. newspaper publishing giant McClatchy Co. said Monday it would lay off 15 percent of its workforce in the face of declining revenues. The cut affects about 1,600 jobs, the publisher said.

Britain 'nation of form fillers watched by quarter of world's CCTV cameras' -- Britain has become a bureaucratic and authoritarian state watched over by a quarter of the world's CCTV cameras, a study of Labour's decade in power claims.

Global Financial Assets Lost $50 Trillion Last Year -- The value of global financial assets including stocks, bonds and currencies probably fell by more than $50 trillion in 2008, equivalent to a year of world gross domestic product, according to an Asian Development Bank report.

New Shock Tech Could Zap Rioters, Cancer Cells -- A new technique using ultra-short electric pulses could allow tomorrow's electroshock weapons to immobilize people for as long as fifteen minutes –- and may one day also be used to destroy tumors.

Cybersecurity Chief Resigns -- The government's coordinator for cybersecurity programs has quit, criticizing what he described as the National Security Agency's grip on cybersecurity

Battlechips: DARPA's next micromachines -- The Pentagon's premiere research shop is working to shrink all kinds of devices — from cryogenic coolers to vacuum pumps to radar to infra-red video cameras — down to the size of a chip. If it works, it could mean whole new classes of weapons and sensors for the American military — and new gadgets for the rest of us.

Civil Unrest in America? -- Things indicates that the much-feared financial meltdown is no longer a distant and remote possibility because in fact it is already taking place. However, this chaos might trigger some very serious and preoccupying consequences. In order to have a clear understanding of these implications, it is vital to take into account some reports that were not given the proper amount of attention they deserved when they were first published. The only thing that can be taken for granted and that one can be sure of is that the unthinkable has now become thinkable.

Today in History March 9, 2009
1454 - Amerigo Vespucci was born in Florence, Italy. Matthias Ringmann, a German mapmaker, named the American continent in his honor.
1788 - Connecticut became the 5th state to join the United States.
1793 - Jean Pierre Blanchard made the first balloon flight in North America. The event was witnessed by U.S. President George Washington.
1820 - The U.S. Congress passed the Land Act that paved the way for westward expansion of North America.
1933 - The U.S. Congress began its 100 days of enacting New Deal legislation.
1954 - WNBT-TV (now WNBC-TV), in New York, broadcast the first local color television commercials. The ad was Castro Decorators of New York City.
1964 - The first Ford Mustang rolled off of the Ford assembly line.
1965 - The first U.S. combat troops arrived in South Vietnam.
1987 - Chrysler Corporation offered to buy American Motors Corporation.
 
NY state assemblyman finds dead goat outside home -- A state assemblyman said he found a dead goat outside his suburban New York home and believes it represents a death threat against him.

Bill would give some vets preference for contracts -- A proposal would give businesses owned by disabled veterans some preference in bidding for state contracts. Supporters of this bill say they want to reward disabled veterans and compensate them for their losses, but those contracting policies can also provide long-term benefits to the state.

FEMA Concentration and Internment Camps -- What is the Federal Emergency Management Agency? Simply put, it is the "secret government". This agency has powers and authority that go well beyond any other agency in the nation. What can FEMA do? It can suspend laws. It can move entire populations. It can arrest and detain citizens without a warrant and can hold them without a trial. It can seize property, food supplies, and transportation systems. And it can even suspend the Constitution of the United States. Be sure to read the "List of Executive Orders' on this website.

FBI Arrests Jan Lindsey, Anti-Tax Activist Featured in “Freedom to Fascism” -- Federal agents swarmed into a local business and home early Thursday morning. Several men are facing charges ranging from owning machine guns to evading taxes. Agents arrested four people, Jan Allen Lindsey, a possible former special investigator for the same bureau, but openly outspoken against the government’s collection of taxes. “In the internal revenue code 26, there’s nothing specific in there,” he said in a documentary about taxes. The IRS begs to differ.

WILL YOU LET THE FEDERAL GOVN'T. TAKE POSSESION OF YOUR MEDICAL RECORDS? By: Devvy Kidd -- Does the New Deal's "National Industrial Recovery Act" which created a massive new bureaucracy called the National Recovery Administration have a familiar ring? It should.

IRS shifts away from private debt collectors -- The Internal Revenue Service's decision this week to quit using debt collectors to dun delinquent taxpayers was celebrated by public employee unions as a pendulum shift after watching the Bush administration often opt for private contractors over federal workers to deliver government services.

"Outlaw the Shadow Banking System!" -- Guess Who Said It?

The Groundwork Has Already Been Laid for Martial Law -- Right now, all we can do is sound the alarm. Become educated. Form local citizens groups in your community. Educate your neighbors on their rights and inform them about the grave possibilities we face in the event of a government-declared emergency.

HR 875 may spell the end of farmer's markets, organic farms...take action NOW!!!!! -- What this will do is force anyone who produces food of any kind, and then transports it to a different location for sale, to register with a new federal agency called the “Food Safety Administration.” Read More...

Contrived US Ammunition Shortage -- Salesmen says that they have not been able to get much and when they do it sells within a few days. Something very strange is happening out here. I can only hope that it is a local phenomenon, but I fear that is much larger.

Ohio school gets 700 applicants for janitorial job -- MASSILON, Ohio – Evidence of the slumping economy is stacking up at an Ohio school which has nearly 700 applications for one open janitorial job.

Diabetes drugs given 'too soon' -- One in three people with type 2 diabetes are given medication too soon, instead of being urged to eat better and do more exercise, a study suggests.

Can you survive economic crisis? --Booming preparedness industry says Americans are stockpiling!

Lean Factories Find It Hard to Cut Jobs Even in a Slump -- This plant, owned by Cleveland-based Parker Hannifin Corp., has become so lean over the past decade that many assembly lines run with only a handful of highly trained workers.

NO AUTISM In Never-Vaccinated Children -- Dr. Mayer Eisenstein, told us he is not aware of any cases of autism in never-vaccinated children; the national rate is 1 in 175, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Elite Bankers Threatened to Release Weaponized Strain of Avian Flu - Military Coup Against Bankers in Progress -- As you read this please remember that RMN has stated many times that the leaders of the new world order are NOT the people you see in the news. Most of the real leaders are nameless and faceless. Keep this in mind as you read this article.

Next shoe to drop for U.S. job seekers: lower wages -- Job seekers -- already coping with the highest unemployment rate in a quarter century, their savings mugged by a plunging stock market -- can also expect lower pay once they land a new job, labor market experts say, because the current downturn shows no signs of turning around anytime soon.

Obamavilles In America by Webster G. Tarpley -- In this depression, the wretched victims of foreclosure by Obama’s pals at Goldman Sachs, Citibank, and JP Morgan live and die in OBAMAVILLES. The arrogant elitist in the White House does not care.

Sacramento tent city at 1,200 & growing -- Sacramento has one of the highest foreclosure rates in the United States. As many as 50 people a week arrive at the tent city and the authorities estimate it is now home to more than 1,200 people.

Car-truck crash kills Zimbabwe prime minister's wife, injures him -- Zimbabwe Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai was in stable condition and recovering from head injuries Friday night after a car wreck that killed his wife, Susan, medical sources told CNN.

Cracks Prompt AF-wide C-130 Inspection -- Air Force officials issued an immediate inspection notice Thursday to C-130 units worldwide after Robins Air Force Base, Ga., technicians found upper wing joint nut cracks in an aircraft undergoing scheduled depot maintenance.

America loses 23,000 jobs every day -- American businesses were forced to shed more than 23,000 jobs every day last month as recession tightened its grip on the economy, pushing the unemployment rate to a 25-year high.

Is the future going down the drain? Baby boomers going bust -- Millions of boomers born into the dawn of the largest economic expansion in history are being forced to re-imagine their retirement futures.

Tests find Bisphenol A in majority of soft drinks -- The estrogen-mimicking chemical BPA, already banished from baby bottles and frowned upon in water jugs, has now shown up in significant levels in soft drinks.

Today in History March 6, 2009

1836 - The thirteen-day siege of the Alamo by Santa Anna and his army ended. The Mexican army of three thousand men defeated the 189 Texas volunteers.
1886 - "The Nightingale" was first published. It was the first magazine for nurses.
1899 - Aspirin was patented by German researchers Felix Hoffman and Hermann Dreser.
1944 - During World War II, U.S. heavy bombers began the first American raid on Berlin. Allied planes dropped 2000 tons of bombs.
1960 - The United States announced that it would send 3,500 troops to Vietnam.
1967 - U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced his plan to establish a draft lottery. .
1981 - U.S. President Reagan announced a plan to cut 37,000 federal jobs.

Political Leaders for 9/11 Truth Statement -- We are calling for a new, independent investigation of 9/11 that takes account of evidence that has been documented by independent researchers but thus far ignored by governments and the mainstream media.
Related Articles:
* POLITICAL LEADERS FOR 9/11 TRUTH LAUNCHED TODAY -- Political Leaders for 9/11 Truth (pl911truth.com) is today being launched as the latest formal group calling for a new investigation into the events of September 11, 2001. The organization is headed by Councilor (Senator) Yukihisa Fujita of Japan and former Senator Karen Johnson of Arizona.
* Lawyers for 9/11 Truth -- Many lawyers have concluded that the 9/11 Commission and other government examinations were wholly inadequate, and did not follow proper rules of evidence or procedure.
* VIDEO: 9/11: Press for Truth -- Released September 8th; a video from the families who fought to create The 9/11 Comission.

Natural Home Treatments for a Cough -- You can get even more relief by stirring a tablespoon of lemon juice into 1/4 cup of honey. This homemade cough syrup will immediately calm your coughing and can be used multiple times throughout your day if necessary. If possible, add a teaspoon of white pepper to the mixture to further ease your cough. Read More...

6 firms stop sales of hard-plastic baby bottles -- Bending to growing public and legal pressure that began in San Francisco, six major companies have agreed to stop selling hard-plastic baby bottles containing bisphenol A, an industrial chemical suspected of harming human development.

Gupta withdraws from surgeon general search -- CNN medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta won't be the next surgeon general, the Obama administration confirmed Thursday.

Vet Denied Gun Permit Over PTSD Care -- A Veteran sought to buy a 9-mm Ruger pistol for protection at his midtown apartment, the Omaha Police Department rejected his application for a gun permit. The Veteran had received counseling for post-traumatic stress disorder related to his service in Iraq. While completing an application for a gun permit, he responded "yes" to a question that asked whether he was being treated for a mental disorder.

Gold & The Panic Phase -- "Cash is prescribed in that perfectly crafted document called the US Constitution. Gold & silver are the only forms of money that can legally satisfy debts public and private. That near perfect document has also been betrayed, with even the last president calling it a ‘mere piece of paper’ incredibly."

Chavez orders food giant Cargill takeover -- Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has renewed nationalizing drive, taking over some of the operations of American food giant Cargill.

Food stamp enrollment jumps to record 31.8 million -- A record 31.8 million Americans received food stamps at the latest count, an increase of 700,000 people in one month with the United States in recession, government figures showed on Thursday.

New study points to GM contamination of Mexican corn -- Genes from genetically-engineered corn have been found in traditional crop strains in Mexico, according to a new study likely to reignite a bitter controversy over biotech maize.

Does New Zealand face the fate of Iceland? -- The economy is in its worst recession on record, the current account deficit is ballooning, the government faces a sea of red ink and credit ratings firms have the country under the microscope - is New Zealand the sick man of the South Pacific?

Magnolia Begins Fluoridation of Water -- Delaware's Division of Public Health's Office of Drinking Water announced that the Town of Magnolia will add fluoride to its public water system on March 11 to comply with state law.

Fed Refuses to Release Bank Data, Insists on Secrecy (Update3) -- The Fed refused yesterday to disclose the names of the borrowers and the loans, alleging that it would cast “a stigma” on recipients of more than $1.9 trillion of emergency credit from U.S. taxpayers and the assets the central bank is accepting as collateral.


UK: Motorist pulled over and quizzed... for LAUGHING at the wheel -- Mr Sanders had been talking on a hands-free kit and was chuckling at what his friend had said. But the officer who ordered him to stop at the exit to the Mersey Tunnel told him: ‘Laughing while driving a car can be an offence.’ Read More...

Jesse Jackson Jr. Seeks To Insert Communism In The U.S. Constitution -- "The proposed amendments sound like something that would be written by Karl Marx or a politician in the old Soviet Union. These are some of the dumbest proposed Constitutional amendments ever in the history of this country, and Jackson should be removed from office just based on the stupidity of these proposals."

Today in history March 5, 2009

1836 - Samuel Colt manufactured the first pistol (.34-caliber).
1845 - The U.S. Congress appropriated $30,000 to ship camels to the western U.S.
1868 - The U.S. Senate was organized into a court of impeachment to decide charges against President Andrew Johnson.
1910 - In Philadelphia, PA, 60,000 people left their jobs to show support for striking transit workers.
1922 - Phoebe Anne Oakley Mozee broke all existing records for women's trap shooting. She hit 98 out of 100 targets.
1933 - U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered a four-day bank holiday in order to stop large amounts of money from being withdrawn from banks.
1977 - U.S. President Jimmy Carter appeared on CBS News with Walter Cronkite for the first "Dial-a-President" radio talk show.
1993 - Cuban President Fidel Castro said that Hillary Clinton is "a beautiful woman."

More military officers demand eligibility proof -- Military officers from the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines are working with California attorney Orly Taitz and her Defend Our Freedoms Foundation, citing a legal right established in British common law nearly 800 years ago and recognized by the U.S. Founding Fathers to demand documentation that may prove – or disprove – Barack Obama's eligibility to be president.

VIDEO: The Daily Show: Mess O'Potamia - The Iraq War Is Over -- Barack Obama announces that everyone is coming home except for several dozen thousands of soldiers.

Unopened claims letters hidden at VA offices -- A new report about Veterans Affairs Department employees squirreling away tens of thousands of unopened letters related to benefits claims is sparking fresh concerns that veterans and their survivors are being cheated out of money.

'Israel seriously considering military action against Iran' -- Israel is seriously considering taking unilateral military action to stop Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons, according to a report by top US political figures and experts released Wednesday.

Armenia: Falling Currency Leads to Run on Stores -- Armenians rushed to buy bread, butter and other staples on Tuesday and stores shut down in panic after the government announced it would let the currency fall and was seeking a bailout from the International Monetary Fund.

Comic Strip by Mike Luckovich -- The End is Near.

Artificial Night Lights Increase Cancer Risk -- Using various statistical methods, the researchers found that there was a clear correlation between levels of artificial light at night and electricity use with prostate cancer rates. The next part of their analysis involved the measure "amount of artificial light per night per person", which the study team used to categorize the countries into three groups - those with little, medium and high exposure to artificial night lighting.

You’re Dead? That Won’t Stop the Debt Collector -- The banks need another bailout and countless homeowners cannot handle their mortgage payments, but one group is paying its bills: the dead. Read More...

Tenants Wary of Clustering of Homeless -- With the number of homeless families in New York at near-record levels, cluster-site has quietly replaced the costly and controversial scatter-site housing program that the Bloomberg administration pledged in 2002 to wipe out.

Food – the Ultimate Barter Item -- You can easily store foods for troubled times. If you are at all interested in securing a food supply for your family, please don't wait. Get your supplies!

China Container Shipments To North America Stalled -- Dr. Fu said the worst of the global recession would be over by 2010, but only if the U.S. government is able to solve its banking crisis and get the major banks to start lending again.

U.S. Troop Brain Injuries Could Reach 360,000 -- The number of U.S. troops who have suffered wartime brain injuries may be as high as 360,000 and could cast more attention on such injuries among civilians, Defense Department doctors said Wednesday.

13 former FEMA trailers in Missouri deemed toxic -- Thirteen former FEMA trailers in eastern Missouri have been banned for use as housing because their formaldehyde levels are too high, the chairman of the Missouri Public Service Commission said Tuesday.

Cedar Rapids police seek BB gun restriction -- Cedar Rapids police want the city to ban carrying BB and paintball guns in public unless they're kept in a case.

Is A Major War A Possibility In 2009? -- by Dr. Frederic F. Clairmont

Transportation Secretary calls for more tolls, public private partnerships etc

House Judiciary Committee Secures Rove and Miers Testimony in U.S. Attorney Firings -- In an agreement reached today between the former Bush administration and Congressman John Conyers, Jr. (D-Mich.), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Karl Rove and former White House Counsel Harriet Miers will testify before the House Judiciary Committee in transcribed depositions under penalty of perjury. The committee has also reserved the right to have public testimony from Rove and Miers. It was agreed that invocations of official privileges would be significantly limited.

China readies military space station – launch coincides with shuttle phaseout -- China is aggressively accelerating the pace of its manned space program by developing a 17,000 lb. man-tended military space laboratory planned for launch by late 2010. The mission will coincide with a halt in U.S. manned flight with phase-out of the shuttle.

US Justice Department memos: the specter of military dictatorship -- A set of nine secret memos released by the US Justice Department Monday reveal that in the weeks and months after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks the US government began erecting the legal scaffolding for a full-blown military dictatorship.

SV40 Cancer Foundation is setting up SV40 testing -- Currently, the SV40 Cancer Foundation is setting up SV40 testing with several prominent hospitals and laboratories.

Ted Kennedy to Receive Honorary Knighthood From Queen Elizabeth II -- The honor was formally announced in Washington Wednesday by British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, during his address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress. PM Brown praised Kennedy's role in bringing peace to Northern Ireland after generations of civil strife, and his decades of work to strengthen health care and education opportunities in the United States and around the globe.

U.S. private sector cuts 697,000 jobs in February -- U.S. private sector job losses accelerated in February, according to a report by ADP Employer Services that suggests hefty employment declines are on the way in the government's payrolls report due on Friday.

Flu Pandemic Would Catch U.S. Unprepared -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has concluded that the nation is unprepared for the true effects of a pandemic such as that expected from avian flu.

Patients can sue drug companies, Supreme Court rules -- Patients have the right to sue drug companies when they've been harmed by medications whose risks aren't adequately disclosed, the Supreme Court ruled today in an important 6-3 decision.

YouTube: The 2nd American Revolution has Started - ( The Civilians Military ) -- Rough language, but reflects growing sentiment. Check out all the other "revolution" videos in the box on the right. Heeeere it coooooomes! (Video about the growing threat to our liberty by Big Brother)

Russian scholar says US will collapse - next year -- If you’re inclined to believe Igor Panarin, and the Kremlin wouldn’t mind if you did, then President Barack Obama will order martial law this year, the U.S. will split into six rump-states before 2011, and Russia and China will become the backbones of a new world order.

YouTube: TV Show Predicts Next American Civil War? "Jericho" -- Media Spin Next American Civil War? Next Revolution..... Revolt, Protect Freedom....!

Treasuries Drop on Potential $60 Billion Note Sale Next Week -- Treasuries fell, extending the worst losses in five years, as stocks gained and on speculation the U.S. will announce plans tomorrow to sell $60 billion of debt next week as it borrows record amounts to spur the economy.

Tehran missiles 'can hit Israel' -- "Today, Iran has missiles with the range of 2,000km, and based on that all Israeli land including that regime's nuclear facilities are in the range of our missile capabilities," Revolutionary Guards commander Mohammad Ali Jafari said in comments carried by the ISNA news agency.

The Violent Overthrow of the Government by Mark Yannone -- Are you ready for the violent overthrow of the United States federal government? The federal government is. Do you wonder why? Well, wonder no more. The greatest depression is just barely started, and all federal plans are intended to deepen and prolong the crushing economic disaster. How many of our 320 million population will have to be homeless or starving before the riots reduce this country to a rubble-strewn war zone? Now consider this: The concentration camps - Glenn Beck: "Concentration camps are ready in every state"

Military may patrol bar zone in Barrie -- Police chief agreeable to having army officers help his squad to curb weekend rowdyism.

DHS official who brought dead fish to office on administrative leave -- A senior Homeland Security Department intelligence official has been placed on administrative leave after an incident in which a dead fish and white powder were brought to department offices in Washington this month, according to two sources. Read More...

Pitchfork Time By Patrick J. Buchanan

Today in History March 4, 2009
1789 - The first Congress of the United States met in New York and declared that the U.S. Constitution was in effect.
1791 - Vermont was admitted as the 14th U.S. state. It was the first addition to the original 13 American colonies.
1794 - The 11th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed by the U.S. Congress. The Amendment limited the jurisdiction of the federal courts to
automatically hear cases brought against a state by the citizens of another state. Later interpretations expanded this to include citizens of the state being
sued, as well.
1826 - The first railroad in the U.S. was chartered. It was the Granite Railway in Quincy, MA.
1877 - Emile Berliner invented the microphone.
1917 - Jeanette Rankin of Montana took her seat as the first woman elected to the House of Representatives.
1933 - U.S. President Roosevelt gave his inauguration speech in which he said "We have nothing to fear, but fear itself."
1952 - U.S. President Harry Truman dedicated the "Courier," the first seagoing radio broadcasting station.

THE CITIZEN'S RULE BOOK NOW ONLINE -- Download and print for your convenience.

Great Chart for Food Weights & Approximate Equivalents in Measure

100 Items to Disappear First -- Listeners - BE PREPARED!!!

YouTube: HOMEGROWN REVOLUTION -- Radical Change Taking Root!

Thousands of Mexican soldiers pour into the country's most violent city in crackdown on drug gangs -- Nearly 2,000 Mexican soldiers and armed federal police poured into the border town of Ciudad Juarez last weekend. The city - just across from El Paso in Texas - has been ravaged by drug gangs. Just this month 250 people were killed there by hitmen fighting for lucrative smuggling routes.

False Dates on VA Claims -- In a newly released report, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs concluded that management at the New York City regional office had, for years, directed employees to backdate veterans' benefit claims to appear as if they were being processed faster than they really were.

W.Va. Guard members may have been exposed to toxin in Iraq -- The West Virginia National Guard is trying to track down 130 reservists who were probably exposed to a cancer-causing chemical in 2003 while guarding a water facility in southern Iraq. The move follows similar efforts by the Indiana and Oregon National Guards, whose soldiers were also believed to have been exposed to sodium dichromate. The soldiers were guarding civilians who were repairing the Qarmat Ali plant under the supervision of Houston-based defense contractor KBR.

Deadly weapons testing in Pacific Northwest -- The Navy and Dept. of Defense on behalf of the military industrial complex will be expanding its weapons testing programs in the P.N.W. and that will undoubtedly bring about new environmental insults to the area. More aerosol spraying of the skies, more microwave and sonar, more biological weapons testing, etc. Public comments are needed as are phone calls to your reps. and senators.

SOCOM: the covert army of the US -- SOCOM (US Special Operations Command) oversees the various special operations commands of the Army, Navy, Air Force and the Marines. It conducts both covert and overt missions, including unconventional warfare, foreign internal defense, special reconnaissance and psychological, direct action, counterterrorism and anti-narcotics operations. In fact, SOCOM has been the driving force of both the war in Iraq and the war in Afghanistan since before both officially started.

GE down the tubes? -- Is a bankruptcy in the future for General Electric?

FOFOA: Bankrupt Economics -- When the dollar finally dives in value it will be very fast and will catch everyone off guard. It will wipe out state's debt, our national debt, and all other debt denominated in US dollars. It will also wipe out anyone's savings which are in dollars. And it will also wipe out paper investments denominated in dollars, like mutual funds, pension funds, stocks, bonds, annuities, insurance policies, Social Security promises, etc...

Vitamin D-deficiency crisis looms, researcher warns -- "It's quite likely that chronic nutritional vitamin D deficiency puts all of us at risk for developing debilitating, long-latency, chronic diseases," Wagner said. "Diseases such as insulin-resistance, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer and autoimmune diseases."

Vaccines as Biological Weapons? Live Avian Flu Virus Placed in Baxter Vaccine Materials Sent to 18 Countries -- Deerfield, Illinois-based pharmaceutical company Baxter International Inc. has just been caught shipping live avian flu viruses mixed with vaccine material to medical distributors in 18 countries. The "mistake" was discovered by the National Microbiology Laboratory in Canada. The World Health Organization was alerted and panic spread throughout the vaccine community as health experts asked the obvious question: How could this have happened?
Related Article:
The 1918 Influenza Pandemic, Vaccines and Flu Shots

Cleansing toxic waste -- with vinegar -- Engineers and environmental scientists at the University of Leeds are developing methods of helping contaminated water to clean itself by adding simple organic chemicals such as vinegar.

VIDEO: Glenn Beck Mentions FEMA Camps on Fox & Friends

YouTube: Lou Dobbs: Major Public Concerns Of Martial Law In The U.S. Army gearing up 20000 in USA! -- "This is no conspiracy theory. Get informed and prepared."

EU nations refuse to force members to farm GM maize -- EU nations refused Monday to force Austria and Hungary to allow the cultivation of Monsanto genetically modified maize, defying a call from the European Commission, the Czech EU presidency said.

Medical journal reveals that 70 percent of drug decision-making panel members have financial ties to industry -- The journal Nature has published studies showing that 70 percent of the drug decision panels run in this country are rigged with decision-makers who have strong financial ties to the very drug companies whose products are affected by these decisions.

Seattle Tea Party Pictures -- Across the nation on February 27th, 2009, conservatives and disillusioned moderates came out to protest the massive government spending that has been defining the new Obama presidency. People are mad.

10 Things Credit Card Companies Won't Say -- Many things can bump your credit card interest rate into the red zone, but nothing faster than what’s called “universal default." Read More....

Obama Lied To Gun Owners - Attack Plan Revealed -- As a presidential candidate, Barack Obama deliberately and repeatedly lied to America's 90 million gun owners across the country when he insisted that he would not try to take away anyone's firearms, the Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms said. Read More...

Obama & Biden chipped or wearing tracking devices? -- Obama, Biden, and other “senior White House officials” are lojacked? It makes sense that they’d be wearing/carrying something (or is it, as seems likely, an injected RFID chip?) that always gives their location in case of kidnapping, medical emergency, etc. Read More...

Today in History March 3, 2009

1791 - The U.S. Congress passed a resolution that created the U.S. Mint.
1812 - The U.S. Congress passed the first foreign aid bill.
1845 - The U.S. Congress passed legislation overriding a U.S. President’s veto. It was the first time the Congress had achieved this.
1849 - The U.S. Department of the Interior was established.
1849 - The Gold Coinage Act was passed by the U.S. Congress. It allowed the minting of gold coins.
1851 - The U.S. Congress authorized the 3-cent piece. It was the smallest U.S. silver coin.
1863 - Free city delivery of mail was authorized by the U.S. Postal Service.
1906 - A Frenchman tried the first flight in an airplane with tires.
1908 - The U.S. government declared open war on on U.S. anarchists.
1910 - J.D. Rockefeller Jr. announced his withdrawal from business to administer his father's fortune for an "uplift in humanity". He also appealed to the
U.S. Congress for the creation of the Rockefeller Foundation

Congress Reaching For Soldier's Wallets? -- If the latest "suggestions" (or shall we call it "Congressional Monetary Piracy"?) are approved, active Duty as well as retired Military will face an unprecedented increase in health care costs

BLACKFIVE: Options To Limit Your Benefit

Do Not Raise Military Community Healthcare Costs -- For years, the military community has endured the broken promise of health care for life in return for turning over life and liberty in service to country. While military services recruited with promises of health care for life in exchange for 20 years or more of service, courts and Congress itself has consistently argued they had no legal right to do so.

‘Tidal wave’ of homeless students hits schools -- While the problem may be worse in economically stricken regions like Southern California, where foreclosures and job losses are taking a harsh toll on families, anecdotal evidence suggests it is a growing issue nationally and one with serious ramifications for both a future generation and the overburdened public school system.

Dow drops below 7,000 for first time since 1997 -- The credit crisis and recession have slashed more than half the average's value since it hit a record high over 14,000 in October 2007. And now many investors fear the market could take a long time to regain the lost 7,000.

Obama Kicks Up White House Entertaining -- The White House is the place to be on Wednesdays. Since the presidency changed hands less than six weeks ago, a burst of entertaining has taken hold of the iconic, white-columned home of America's head of state. Much of it comes on Wednesdays.

Raul Castro ousts top Cubans loyal to Fidel Castro -- Cuban President Raul Castro's decision to ouster powerful officials close to his brother Fidel raises questions both about who will succeed him and how the biggest government shakeup since he took power a year ago will impact U.S.-Cuba relations.

Jim Rogers - Terrific Interview -- Jim Rogers interviewed in Australia explains why we need to face reality.

Vermont issues RFID licenses -- The Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles began accepting applications for the enhanced licenses on Feb. 18 through its Montpelier office. The new card is voluntary and costs $25 more than a standard license.

Do you want fries with your license? -- Missourians already wait in burger-joint-like lines to apply for a new driver’s license. But they also could choose from a menu of driver’s license options once they make it to the front counter, under legislation on its way to debate in the House of Representatives.

Nationwide Ammunition Shortage Hits U.S. -- Skyrocketing demand has been emptying the shelves of America's gun stores. Learn why.

Experts fight H5N1 bird flu using smallpox vaccine -- Scientists in Hong Kong and the United States have developed an experimental H5N1 bird flu vaccine for people by piggybacking it on the well-tested and highly successful smallpox vaccine.

Veterans at 'higher suicide risk' -- Young ex-servicemen are three times more likely to kill themselves than their civilian counterparts, a study has suggested.

Grow your own drugs: a medicine cabinet in your garden -- Botanist James Wong raids the flowerbeds for cures to everyday ailments from coughs to eczema.

Morgellons: Terrifying New Disease Reaching Pandemic Status -- Morgellons is now reaching epidemic proportions in the U.S. and abroad. Morgellons is a multi-dimensional disease. Morgellons starts with relentless itching, stinging or biting sensations. Read More...

Secret Bush memos made public by Obama -- The Justice Department on Monday released a long-secret legal document from 2001 in which the Bush administration claimed the military could search and seize terror suspects in the United States without warrants.

FEMA's Citizen Corps Partners With United States Power Squadrons -- With over 2,300 local Citizen Corps Councils nationwide, Citizen Corps brings together and involves community and government leaders, community members and organizations in all-hazards emergency preparedness, planning, mitigation, response, and recovery. Citizen Corps and the U.S. Power Squadrons each view community safety and emergency preparedness as a top priority for their respective organizations and the general public.
Related Article: Description of US Power Squadron

Ukraine risks unrest as ills worsen -- Bank accounts have been frozen.

And now for the weather -- Controlling the planet weather modification.

Today in History - March 2, 2009
1836 - Texas declared its independence from Mexico and an ad interim government was formed.
1861 - The U.S. Congress created the Territory of Nevada.
1866 - Excelsior Needle Company began making sewing machine needles. 1877 - In the U.S., Rutherford B. Hayes was declared the winner of the 1876 presidential
election by the U.S. Congress. Samuel J. Tilden, however, had won the popular vote on November 7, 1876.
1901 - The first telegraph company in Hawaii opened.
1917 - The Russian Revolution began with Czar Nicholas II abdicating.
1925 - State and federal highway officials developed a nationwide route-numbering system and adopted the familiar U.S. shield-shaped, numbered marker.
1939 - The Massachusetts legislature voted to ratify the Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution. These first ten amendments had gone into effect 147 years
before.
1974 - Postage stamps jumped from 8 to 10 cents for first-class mail.

Radio Broadcasting Pioneer Paul Harvey Dies at 90 -- Paul Harvey, the distinctly voiced news commentator whose radio career spanned nearly 60 years, died on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2009 in Arizona, a spokesman for ABC Radio Networks tells the Associated Press. He was 90.
Related Article:
A Salute To Paul Harvey

Sascha Opel: Bull Market Just Beginning (for gold) - Gold is now starting to establish new all-time highs in all those currencies -- The masses will slowly realize that no paper currency is safe in the near future."

Trading in HSBC shares suspended in Hong Kong -- Trading in shares of HSBC Holdings was suspended for Monday's session in Hong Kong, pending what the bank called "the announcement of a corporate action," as the company was expected to reveal a pullback from its U.S. consumer lending business. "We're in a lot of Trouble"

Founder, CEO of Blackwater Steps Aside, 'Worn Out' -- Erik Prince, who founded security contractor Blackwater Worldwide and remained defiant after the company became embroiled in controversy following a deadly 2007 shooting incident in Baghdad, is stepping down as chief executive of the parent company.

Unemployment way up -- The recession tightened its grip on U.S. businesses and consumers in February, according to economists, who are predicting the largest one-month job loss in almost 60 years.

Is the California True Unemployment Rate at 18.47 Percent? -- The 10.1% Headline Number is the Highest Rate in Over a Quarter Century. 1.8 Million Workers Unemployed in one State. How Many are Partially Employed or Have Given up Looking for Work?

Ireland Next? -- Is Ireland fated to be another Iceland?As Taoiseach Brian Cowen announces tough measures for the economy, Landon Thomas of the New York Times speaks to a financial expert who predicts that the country could be on course for a catastrophic collapse.

AIG to get even more money from the government! -- The government unveiled a revamped rescue package to insurance giant American International Group and will provide the troubled company another $30 billion on an "as needed" basis.

Finally, a good bank story -- Working Through Hard Times - No Wall Street meltdown here - Evansville - At the Union Bank & Trust Company, the bosses commute to work on foot, a bailout is still a quick loan to a longtime client and the annual customer appreciation picnic is a pig roast in a public park. Time to "bring it all home" and stop patronizing the big guys.

EU Rejects Pleas for Eastern Aid Package, Bailout for Carmakers -- European Union leaders rejected pleas for an aid package for eastern Europe and EU funds for carmakers, bowing to German concerns over budget deficits as the economic slump deepens.

Delphi Allowed to Cancel Benefits for 15,000 Workers -- Delphi Corp., the bankrupt auto- parts maker, won permission to cancel health-care benefits for 15,000 current and former salaried workers, saving $1.1 billion as it tries to emerge from court protection amid falling vehicle sales.

Laid-Off Lawyers and Other Professionals -- Most Americans (64%) now classify themselves not as blue- or white-collar workers but as professionals. And so as this recession hit, Detroit is having another round of problems, but so is New York, San Francisco, Seattle and all of the professional capitals of America.

Stocks Decline From Tokyo to London; HSBC, BHP Billiton Retreat -- Stocks in Europe and Asia and U.S. futures slumped, while Treasuries and gold rose as Warren Buffett said the American economy is in a “shambles” and concern grew that financial firms will need more capital.

US Gives China Eminent Domain Over US Property -- Let's connect some dots today to learn about the HIGHEST POSSIBLE TREASON that has happened in this country. THIS IS AS REAL AND AS UGLY AS IT CAN GET.

Speech delivered in December, 2005 by Comrade Chi Haotian -- The Following is the actual text of a speech delivered in December, 2005 by Comrade Chi Haotian - the Vice-Chairman of China's Military Commision to top officers and generals. This is a .pdf file.

Ron Paul-A Voice in the Wilderness No More -- At CPAC, Ron Paul's critique of the monetary system and the Republican party is surprisingly more popular than ever.

Maine Town Passes Ordinance Asserting Local Self-Governance and Stripping Corporate Personhood -- The citizens of Shapleigh, Maine voted at a special town meeting to pass a groundbreaking Rights-Based Ordinance, 114 for and 66 against. This revolutionary ordinance give its citizens the right to local self-governance and gives rights to ecosystems but denies the rights of person hood to corporations. This ordinance allows the citizens to protect their groundwater resources, putting it in a common trust to be used for the benefit of its residents.

Report Outlines FEMA Storm Failings -- FEMA spent more than $7.2 billion to house hurricane victims in mobile units, including travel trailers, that were eventually scrapped after reports that formaldehyde fumes affected occupants. Landrieu’s staff spent six months looking at the national disaster housing policies of the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

US Commission calls for mileage-based road tax -- The National Surface Transportation Infrastructure Financing Commission (NSTFIC) has spent almost two years studying possible funding models and claims that there is a growing consensus to move toward a system based, “more directly on use of the highway system measured by miles driven”.

CERTIFIED WIDE AREA ROAD USE MONITORING -- Certified Wide Area Road Use Monitoring (C-WARUM) is a 100% private sector, global application of intelligent transportation system (ITS) technologies, principally directed at improving travel safety, the administrative efficiency of regulatory programs, and the operating productivity of the highway transport sector. Such improvements would be achieved through an open marketplace of confidential information services based on the individual's monitoring of his/her own road use.

Clint Eastwood Slams Political Correctness -- "I don't want to be politically correct. We're all spending too much time and energy trying to be politically correct about everything."

Mobile prison cells will cage criminals on the beat -- Police will be given mobile cells to target offenders in crime hotspots and shopping centres under plans by the Conservatives to free up officers.

$1T IN TAXES IS HELL TO PAY -- Big government is back - and so are big taxes. President Obama unveiled a mammoth, $3.6 trillion budget yesterday that would dramatically boost federal spending almost across the board - and pay for it with tax hikes of $1 trillion on individuals and businesses over the next decade.

Radio chip coming soon to your driver's license? -- Homeland Security seeks next-generation REAL ID.

Lawmaker warns of forced servitude under Obama -- New Hampshire state representative Dan Itse, who is one of many lawmakers leading the charge to assert state sovereignty against federal encroachment, has warned that the Obama administration seeks to institute “involuntary servitude”.

MI5 ALERT ON BANK RIOTS -- TOP secret contingency plans have been drawn up to counter the threat posed by a “summer of discontent” in Britain.

Protest In AZ Against Obama -- These pictures are from protests at Obama's visit to AZ. Did you see any of this on TV or in the papers? Of course not! If this had been Bush it would have been headlines in every major paper and the lead story of the 5 communist TV networks, (CNN, NBC, ABC, CBS, CNBC). That's why we need to circulate this.

Worst drought in 50 years hits China -- Eight provinces in central and north China have been struck by the drought. The most populous - Henan province, with nearly 100 million people - is among the hardest hit. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, 60 percent of Henan's wheat crop could fail if the drought doesn't end in the next month.

Judge paid off? -- W.Va. Justice Ruled for a Man Who Spent Millions to Elect Him.

Scientists develop new bird flu vaccine -- Hong Kong and US scientists have developed a new vaccine against the H5N1 bird flu virus which could be cheaper and more effective than its predecessors, the University of Hong Kong said today.

Vitamin D Helps Ward Off Age-Related Mental Decline -- A study to be published in the Journal of Geriatric Psychology and Neurology has revealed that vitamin D could help ward off the decline in mental function which usually accompanies old age. Its findings add on to other recent studies which had also suggested vitamin D has protective effects in this area.

Fresh Pineapple Has Many Benefits -- Pineapple is a remarkable fruit. We find it enjoyable because of its lush, sweet and exotic flavor, but it may be one of the most healthful foods available today. If we take a more detailed look at it, we will find that pineapple is valuable for easing indigestion, arthritis or sinusitis. The juice has an anthelmintic effect; it helps get rid of intestinal worms. Let's look at how pineapple affects other conditions. Read More...

Challenging 'USA Incorporated' -- Could this be an ominous shadow drawing on the end of the United States of America?

Americans in Appalachia Are Living in a State of Terror -- "My family and I, like many American citizens in Appalachia, are living in a state of terror. Like sitting ducks waiting to be buried in an avalanche of mountain waste, or crushed by a falling boulder, we are trapped in a war zone within our own country."I beg you to re-light our flame of hope and honor and immediately stop the coal companies from blasting so near our homes and endangering our lives. As you have said, we must find another way than blowing off the tops of our mountains. We must end mountaintop removal.

Revealed: Scientific evidence for the 2001 anthrax attacks -- KEY forensic evidence in the US anthrax attacks of 2001 has been revealed. The FBI had previously prevented the scientists involved from speaking publicly about their findings in case this interfered with court proceedings, but last August, after chief suspect Bruce Ivins committed suicide, the case collapsed and the FBI lifted many of the restrictions. This week, some of the scientists involved revealed their results at a scientific meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

CFR professor reveals plans for military coup in 2012 -- During the FIU New World Order Summit, a professor at the school named Dr. Mark B. Rosenberg raised the concern during a panel session about the possibility of a military coup taking place in the United States by the year 2012. This was not theorizing, he was simply citing a study that took place at the Army War College.


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